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Placing coverage of the invasion in context
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In order to place British coverage of the invasion in context, this chapter offers brief summaries of the structure and character of Britain's television news services and its press. It describes key events in the run-up to the invasion, its main combat phase and its aftermath. British television is founded on the notion of public service broadcasting, in which news is seen as a crucial democratic resource for citizenship, with its reliability underpinned by a robust system of regulation. With Britain's newspapers drawing readers from across the class spectrum, an important competitive factor in the structure of the British press is market stratification. The invasion of Iraq on 21 March 2003, codenamed Operation Iraqi Freedom in the USA and Operation Telic in the UK, represented the end of a remarkable period of domestic and global debate and controversy.

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Pockets of resistance

British news media, war and theory in the 2003 invasion of Iraq

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