‘These young men who come down from Oxford and write gossip’
Society gossip, homosexuality and the logic of revelation in the interwar popular press
in British queer history
Abstract only
Get Access to Full Text

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

manchesterhive requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals - to see content that you/your institution should have access to, please log in through your library system or with your personal username and password.

If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/extracts and download selected front and end matter. 

Access Tokens

If you have an access token for this content, you can redeem this via the link below:

Redeem token

This chapter aims to expose the queer implications of celebrity gossip writing. Celebrity gossip writing began as an Edwardian dandy's occupation. The British popular press gossip was a mass-media version of the arch dandy circulating in aristocratic and bohemian circles, a standard figure in British society since the days of Beau Brummell. Some of the gossip writers who would later look for work on Fleet Street sharpened their teeth writing for the Oxford aesthete journal Isis. Gossip writers, like candid photographers whose skill at capturing embarrassing behaviour on camera was called upon extensively in the early and mid-1930s, provided testimonial evidence of the less than savoury aspects of celebrity life. Godfrey Winn faced the discrimination from some of the more bigoted newspapermen that most homosexual journalists in Britain faced, but that seemed to have no negative effect on his success as a gossip writer.

British queer history

New approaches and perspectives

Editor: Brian Lewis
INFORMATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
METRICS

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 51 32 0
Full Text Views 32 20 0
PDF Downloads 33 24 0
RELATED CONTENT