Margaret Atwood’s monsters in the Canadian ecoGothic
in Ecogothic
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This chapter explores the possibility of Gothic literature serving as a form to critique environmental destruction and advocate restoration. It suggests that Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood are at the inception of a nascent mutation of the Gothic, the Canadian ecoGothic. The chapter suggests that Atwood's Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood are at the inception of a nascent mutation of the Gothic, what is termed as the Canadian ecoGothic. Canadian ecoGothics, such as Shani Mootoo's The Cereus Blooms at Night, pair sexual and colonial oppression with nature and the destruction of nature. They also seem to promise redemption through the tending and replanting of the natural world. Atwood is clearly using the markers of the Gothic to advocate environmental awareness and change before the crazed monsters at the centre of the text destroy all life forms.

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