The Mauritius Truth and Justice Commission
‘Eyewash’, ‘storm in a teacup’ or promise of a new future for Mauritians?
in Emancipation and the remaking of the British imperial world
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The Mauritius Truth and Justice Commission (TJC), established in 2009 and reporting in 2012, represents a unique state-sponsored examination of the history of unfree labour and its consequences for a modern society as a basis for developing recommendations for reparations. The extraordinary character of this official body was compounded by the fact that its mandate embraced not only chattel slavery but also indentured servitude, and that it was explicitly charged in addition with investigating land dispossession in 19th century Mauritius. This chapter by VijayalakshmiTeelock, a Deputy Chair of the TJC, reviews the background to the establishment of the TJC, discusses some of the critical conceptual and methodological issues facing it, analyses the dimensions of race and caste as they shaped the its context and work, and describes some of the far-reaching recommendations of the TJC and the early evidence of the reception of it's work within Mauritius.

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