Context, scale and generation
The constructions of belonging
in Migrations
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As Ireland became a country of net immigration, the immigrants who came to Ireland were unprecedentedly diverse in terms of background, skills and demographic characteristics. This chapter elaborates the contours of immigrant integration under changing economic and demographic conditions. It analyzes some of the labour market arguments that have framed discussions of economic integration elsewhere, including questions about working conditions and labour market competition. Much of the discussion of 'immigrant jobs' developed in the quite different context of the USA, where undocumented workers are in illegally low-paid, non-permanent, poorly compensated jobs concentrated in household services, landscaping, agriculture and manufacturing. In theory, these jobs would not exist without a supply of immigrants as no native worker would accept these employment conditions. More importantly, most economic versions of integration are overly restrictive in their argument that integration relies upon similar immigrant workers having similar outcomes to native workers.

Migrations

Ireland in a global world

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