Thinking through Transnational Studies, Diaspora Studies and gender
in Women and Irish diaspora identities
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This chapter briefly reviews key debates in Transnational Studies (TS) and Diaspora Studies (DS) before discussing the particular contribution of DS in framing 1990s study of migrant and non-migrant Irish women. As in migration studies more generally, the literature in both TS and DS has only belatedly addressed questions of gender and sexuality. The 1990s saw a proliferation of studies across disciplines in the humanities and social sciences variously invoking the terms transnational(ism) and diaspora in accounting for migration and associated phenomena including transgenerational ethnic identities and cross-border practices. Feminist and queer theory scholarship in Irish DS has begun to address the gender and sexual politics of diaspora by attending to the dynamics of boundary expansion, queering and dissolution. However, the heteronormative logic of Irish diasporic belonging remains hegemonic.

Women and Irish diaspora identities

Theories, concepts and new perspectives

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