Centre or periphery?
The role of Dublin in James Yonge’s Memoriale (1412)
in Dublin
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Idiosyncrasies in James Yonge's script indicate that he was likely educated in Dublin and that he probably apprenticed with an anonymous scribe who worked for the city administration. Yonge's Memoriale serves as both a morally edifying pilgrimage tale and a promotion of Ireland, its saints and its principal city. The Memoriale imitates its literary predecessors in its opening paragraphs, in which the creation of the Purgatory by St. Patrick is discussed. Laurence Rathold returned to Hungary in the summer of 1412, probably carrying a copy of Yonge's Memoriale with him as part of the documentation for his successful pilgrimage. Yonge breaks into the narrative of Rathold's pilgrimage to describe Station Island. In visiting both Santiago de Compostela and St Patrick's Purgatory, Rathold was consciously following in the footsteps of another Hungarian pilgrim, George Grissaphan.

Dublin

Renaissance city of literature

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