Competition and exchange
Exhibitors and their networks
in Windows for the world
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Chapter 4 seeks to ascertain whether those makers who exhibited stained glass at these events were representative of the nineteenth-century stained glass industry at large. It outlines exhibitors’ roles in the bureaucratic organisation of exhibitions and their commercial incentives for participating, revealing how exhibitors responded to the demands of consumers. It demonstrates that these displays helped exhibitors gain commissions and influence abroad, and considers the ways in which these events shaped exhibitors’ reputations.

Windows for the world

Nineteenth-century stained glass and the international exhibitions, 1851– 1900

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