International law – recolonizing the Third World?
Law and conflicts over water in the Krishna River Basin
in Law, history, colonialism
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This chapter attempts to locate the role of law within debates on the imperialist nature of world political economy after international law, through the UN Charter, formally ended colonialism at the end of the Second World War. It examines legal and institutional structures created by British colonization in relation to water, a key resource in social production, and the contradictions it created in society both for the colonial Government and the population in the Krishna River Basin. The chapter explains relationship between the dilemmas of the British colonial Government and later the World Bank and the federal Government in the post-Independence period. It considers the sources of different types of conflict in relation to water, and argues that the processes which keep the issue of water locked into these conflicts are equally important.

Law, history, colonialism

The reach of empire

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