Social capital in anarchist movements
in Black flags and social movements
Abstract only
Get Access to Full Text

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

manchesterhive requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals - to see content that you/your institution should have access to, please log in through your library system or with your personal username and password.

If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/extracts and download selected front and end matter. 

Access Tokens

If you have an access token for this content, you can redeem this via the link below:

Redeem token

This chapter explores ideas from major social capital theorists, including Pierre Bourdieu and Robert Putnam, and considers the value of social capital for anarchist movements. It focuses on a number of issues and questions pertaining to trust. While the combination of trust and distrust may superficially appear to be contradictory or confused, from the vantage point of anarchist movements, it is very sensible and compatible with anarchist values and history. Therefore, these two sentiments are combined in the exploration of those who possess social and political trust. Among contemporary anarchist movements, social capital bonding and bridging takes a variety of forms. Strategies for fostering social capital bonding include creating more opportunities for social activities that take place outside of pure political action, and trying to enhance the respect and tolerance that participants have for each other. Social capital bridging requires the establishment and nurturing of connections between anarchists and non-anarchists.

Black flags and social movements

A sociological analysis of movement anarchism

INFORMATION

METRICS

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 51 14 2
Full Text Views 13 5 0
PDF Downloads 18 13 0
RELATED CONTENT