Colonial hesitation, appropriation, and citation
Qāsim Amīn, empire, and saying ‘no’
in Colonial exchanges
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This chapter identifies the shifts, clarifications, and restatements, and discusses their attendant politics of colonised hesitation. It considers Qasim Amin's references to thinkers like Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, Herbert Spencer, and Charles Darwin, and to places such as Europe and the United States. Building on the scholarship, the chapter then considers the polemical responses by Muḥammad Farid Wajdi and Abd al- Majīd Khayrī. The chapter focuses on the selective appropriation and citation of Amin's own work by his contemporaries in Cairo and in Europe, including the intersection of Cairene and European responses. It describes how one prominent missionary used Amin's Liberation of Women in his diatribes against Arabs and Islam. Amīn's ambivalence about Europe resurfaces: it follows the natural course of history, to such an extent that rather than a condition of coloniser and colonised, Europe is a self-interested rational political actor like early Islamic empires.

Colonial exchanges

Political theory and the agency of the colonized

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