The incendiaries of sedition and confusion
in Reformation without end
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Section IV of this book deals with William Warburton. This introductory chapter to Section IV charts Warburton’s idiosyncratic path to polemical divinity and the principles which guided his work. It traces his path from the law to the church. It also considers his first substantive publication, A Critical and Philosophical Enquiry into the Causes of Prodigies (1727). That work posited a method to distinguish truth from lies and first broached many of the subjects with which he would deal during his long polemical career.

Reformation without end

Religion, politics and the past in post-revolutionary England

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