It’s a London thing

How rare groove, acid house and jungle remapped the city

This book discusses the emergence in London of three specific dance music multicultures in the context of the racialised city. Focusing on rare groove, acid house and jungle it places the emergence of these multi-racial music cultures in the context of theories of space and the historical forces which racialised the city in the late 20th century. Based on a wide range of original interviews with cultural producers – DJs, promoters, producers and dancers - undertaken over 20 years, read alongside cultural theory and contemporary accounts, it argues that music and the practices of space around music have been a crucial way in which racial segregation has been challenged and multiculture has emerged in London.

Abstract only
Get Access to Full Text

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

manchesterhive requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals - to see content that you/your institution should have access to, please log in through your library system or with your personal username and password.

If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/extracts and download selected front and end matter. 

Access Tokens

If you have an access token for this content, you can redeem this via the link below:

Redeem token

 

‘This book is rare and special. It combines loving appreciation of London’s overlooked black music scenes with a richly detailed social history of their place in the evolving life of our city. There really is no other book like it. Caspar Melville knows because he was there.
Paul Gilroy is a recovering vinyl junkie who teaches at UCL

‘I've waited decades for a book like this to be written. Turning each page is like digging through the crates. Important connections, intersections and black sonic samples are weaved throughout the text like a seamless mix. Black British music deserves this kind of attention. It's an important piece of the puzzle of DJ and Club culture that has yet to be assembled in its entirety.
Lynnée Denise is a renowned DJ and lecturer in African American studies at UCLA

‘Caspar goes in deep! I am so proud to be part of the London clubland story he tells.
Gilles Peterson is a club and BBC radio DJ and founder of Brownswood Recordings and Worldwide FM

INFORMATION
FULL BOOK DOWNLOAD

  • Full book PDF download (with hyperlinks)
METRICS
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 113 113 113
Full Text Views 40 40 40
PDF Downloads 53 53 53
RELATED CONTENT