Challenging the colonial and the international
The American Red Cross in the last war of Cuban independence (1895–1898)
in The Red Cross Movement
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This chapter takes one episode of Spain’s modern history as a case study to move the focus of Red Cross historiography towards less rigid national and colonial categories. It focuses on the relief initiatives carried out during the last war of Cuban independence in 1895–8. It suggests that it was here that the American Red Cross openly made its push for world domination of humanitarian power, and challenged the model of colonial expansion practised by other national societies under a model set up and controlled by the International Committee of the Red Cross.

The Red Cross Movement

Myths, practices, turning points

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