Introduction
in The renewal of radicalism
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The introductory chapter begins by providing readers with a brief history of the subject matter and a summary of the debates about politics, identity and ideology in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century England. After highlighting weaknesses in ‘stagist’ and ‘continuity’ accounts of these issues, the introduction outlines the book’s three primary aims: first, to establish the existence of a class-conscious radical tradition in England during the mid- to late nineteenth century; second, to demonstrate that working-class radicals exhibited a strong but conciliatory sense of class and articulated a highly distinctive interpretation of terms, phrases and ideological concepts; and third, to demonstrate that the emergence and growth of labour politics and ideology in these areas represented the renewal rather than the abandonment of the working-class radical tradition. The introduction then outlines the book’s key historiographical, empirical and theoretical contributions to the literature and provides a summary of the book’s methodology and a brief chapter outline.

The renewal of radicalism

Politics, identity and ideology in England, 1867–1924

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