Moral dilemmas
Divorce, birth control and abortion
in Housewives and citizens
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This chapter explores the ways in which voluntary women’s organisations focussed on the concept of citizenship rights and sought to secure the social and civil rights of citizenship for women. Here the focus is on divorce law reform, access to birth control information and the campaign to introduce safe and legal abortion. The diverging views of each organisation with regard to these moral questions are discussed. The difficulties encountered by organisations seeking to enhance women’s lives whilst at the same time defending their moral and religious beliefs is a central theme of this chapter.

Housewives and citizens

Domesticity and the women’s movement in England, 1928–64

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