Business in Ireland is too important to be left to Irish business
in Ireland under austerity
Abstract only
Log-in for full text

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

manchesterhive requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals - to see content that you/your institution should have access to, please log in through your library system or with your personal username and password.

If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/extracts and download selected front and end matter. 

Institutions can purchase access to individual titles; please contact manchesterhive@manchester.ac.uk for pricing options.

ACCESS TOKENS

If you have an access token for this content, you can redeem this via the link below:

Redeem token

Business in Ireland is too important to be left to Irish business. The left must become the promoters and champions of the native enterprise. In addition to the under-performance of the Irish business, it has been the distorted level of the domestic investment. In Ireland, indigenous enterprise is more rooted in the domestic economy than the foreign-owned operations. Irish domestic legal and accounting firms make up 3.2 per cent of all value-added in the market economy. A number of surveys of the managerial skill base have been conducted in Irish domestic enterprises and have found serious flaws. The Irish Congress of Trade Unions, too, launched policy initiatives that sought to prioritise market production through the public economy in its Public Enterprise, Everybody's Business. Neither of these were necessarily revolutionary programmes, but they unashamedly posited the role of the public realm in market production.

Ireland under austerity

Neoliberal crisis, neoliberal solutions

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 123 58 0
Full Text Views 21 0 0
PDF Downloads 13 0 0