Professionals
The Church and education
in The Scots in South Africa
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This chapter focuses on the successful Scots, charting the ways in which key professions were often dominated by those who were educated in Scotland. In migrating to southern Africa, they invariably aspired to positions of power and influence that might have been beyond their reach in Scotland itself. The Church and education is examined.

The Scots in South Africa

Ethnicity, identity, gender and race, 1772–1914

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