The One-shot Sequence and the Rhetoric of the Gaze in Contemporary Italian Cinema and the Films of Paolo Sorrentino
in Film Studies
Abstract only
Get Access to Full Text

Individual article purchase

Individual articles are available for purchase via Reprints Desk, click below for more information

Reprints Desk

 

Have an Access Token?

You can redeem an access token by logging in through the link below

Redeem token

 

Have Institutional Access?

Access content through your institution by choosing the below option and using your institutional log-in.

Connect via institution

The one-shot sequence – the articulation of an entire scene through a single, unbroken long take – is one of the cinema’s most important rhetorical devices and has therefore been much used and widely theorised over the years. This article provides a brief overview of these theories and of the multiple ways in which the one-shot sequence has been used both in world cinema (in general) and Italian cinema (in particular) in order to contextualise its use by one of Italian cinema’s best-known and most significant practitioners, Paolo Sorrentino. Through close analyses of one-shot sequences in Sorrentino’s films L’uomo in più/One Man Up, Le conseguenze dell’amore/The Consequences of Love, This Is the Place and Il divo – La vita spettacoloare di Giulio Andreotti – the article argues that Sorrentino’s predilection for the device is best explained by the wide variety of functions that it serves (as a mark of directorial bravura and auteur status; as a self-reflexive device and meditation on the cinematic gaze; as a political tool; and as a means of generating emotion). While rooted in history, Sorrentino’s use of the one-shot sequence thus transcends its position within Italian film history and discourse.

INFORMATION
METRICS
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1027 1027 54
Full Text Views 63 63 4
PDF Downloads 145 145 8
RELATED CONTENT