Matthew Gibson 1
View More View Less
  • 1 University of Surrey
Bram Stoker and the Treaty of Berlin (1878)
in Gothic Studies
Abstract only
Log-in for full text

Individual article purchase

Individual articles are available for purchase via Reprints Desk, click below for more information

Reprints Desk

 

Have an Access Token?

You can redeem an access token by logging in through the link below

Redeem token

 

Have Institutional Access?

Access content through your institution by choosing the below option and using your institutional log-in.

Connect via institution

This article attempts to understand the importance of Dracula and The Lady of the Shroud in relation to the Eastern Question, and in particular with reference to the controversy caused by the Treaty of Berlin (1878). Centring on Dracula‘s speech on his ethnic origins, the author shows how Stoker has manipulated his sources in order to present his protagonist as being more decidedly involved in wars with the Turks than he in fact was, and in doing so to justify Disraeli‘s pro-Austrian and pro-Turkish line at the Berlin Treaty. In this the influence of Stoker‘s Turcophile brother George makes itself known. During the Bosnia crisis these views change, but are nevertheless in keeping with the conservative and patriotic line.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 24 10 0
Full Text Views 35 0 0
PDF Downloads 22 1 0