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‘Are you a closet bigot?’
Alexandra Parsons

Chapter 8 on Queer Edward II examines how Jarman invokes the figure of the queer child along with activist slogans and autobiographical fragments to create an unusual, imaginative activist text.

in Luminous presence
The Last of England and The Garden
Alexandra Parsons

Chapter 6 relates Jarman's life-writing to his self-representations in films through two experimental feature films: The Last of England and The Garden. These experimental works act as a queer practice of survival, building narrative and providing political contestation through juxtaposition, and changing perception through the combination of often highly personal images. This technique of commingling images becomes important for Jarman, his audiences, and his readership, a way of reactivating or appropriating discourses from sources as diverse as Anglo-Saxon and medieval poetry, and images of domesticity in post-war Britain. The discussion of The Garden introduces the thematic urgency of the physical effects of HIV/AIDS on Jarman’s body and on his self-representations.

in Luminous presence
Testimony and elegy
Alexandra Parsons

Chapter 10 examines Jarman's late diaries, Smiling in Slow Motion, collected posthumously by Keith Collins. Here, we explore his increasingly fragmented documentation of his life and influences, and the changing ways in which he responds to and refutes stereotypical portrayals of HIV/AIDS.

in Luminous presence
A finger in the fishes mouth
Alexandra Parsons

Chapter 1 explores Derek Jarman's first book A finger in the fishes mouth, a chapbook containing poems dating back to his student years. It considers the book’s postcard-poem form and reflects on its engagement with history, conceived of as existing in a perpetual present, as well as its coded autobiographical content.

in Luminous presence
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Addressing intersectionality in the casting and performance of Chris Chibnall / Jodie Whittaker era Doctor Who
Christopher Hogg

Christopher Hogg pays attention to the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, and regionality in the casting and performance of the Chris Chibnall / Jodie Whittaker era of Doctor Who and argues for the progressive agenda of the programme. Through original interview material with the casting director since 2005, Andy Pryor, along with actors Mandip Gill (who plays companion Yasmin Khan) and Julie Hesmondhalgh (who played one-off character Judy Maddox in the episode ‘Kerblam!’), Hogg investigates the experiences, perceptions, and creativity of those who work within the casting and performance of Doctor Who.

in Doctor Who – New Dawn
Interrogating kinship networks with the thirteenth Doctor
Hannah Hamad

In the first years of the Jodie Whittaker era of Doctor Who, the Doctor and her companions refer to themselves as ‘fam’ and represent an alternative to nuclear kinship networks of a heteronormative married couple with biological children. The chapter by Hannah Hamad contributes to work on the cultural politics of race and focuses on the character of black companion Ryan and the way the programme perpetuates damaging stereotypes of black families and in particular that of the absentee black father. This discourse was also presented through the characters of Mickey Smith in Russell T Davies’s 2005 Doctor Who and Clyde Langer in The Sarah Jane Adventures. Hamad reveals how the series celebrates the counter-hegemonic kinship network of the TARDIS crew and also how the series emphasizes that biological fathers must fulfil their social responsibilities in line with the demands of hegemonic family values.

in Doctor Who – New Dawn
Constructing and characterizing Doctor Who’s Thirteen in fashion design and cosplay
Nicolle Lamerichs

In this chapter, Nicolle Lamerichs draws on online data collected from Instagram and a small qualitative sample of Dutch cosplayers. Lamerichs looks at how some fans have responded to the programme’s latest era through cosplay, with cosplayers celebrating and (re-)interpreting the thirteenth Doctor’s costume. By analysing the fashion and design meanings of this new costume, as designed by Ray Holman, the chapter goes on to set out how some queer and female cosplayers have seen much of themselves in this version of the Doctor, becoming involved in performative and ‘affective reception’ in relation to the character. Indeed, it is argued that the fluidity of the Doctor, whose body is never stable, allows for an exceptional form of affective reception and play among these fans. When fans cosplay the thirteenth Doctor, they express their own hopes and expectations for the character, and selectively use her as a resource to form their own identities.

in Doctor Who – New Dawn
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Gender and Doctor Who Barbie dolls, adventure dolls, and 1:6 scale figures
Victoria L. Godwin

This chapter examines thirteenth Doctor toys and collectibles from a fan studies perspective, focusing on figures like Mattel’s posable thirteenth Doctor Barbie doll. Victoria Godwin argues that different marketing names such as ‘dolls’, or even ‘adventure dolls’, can be linked to anxieties around ‘feminizing’ fandom, whereas similar toys targeted at boys have typically been positioned as ‘action figures’ instead. This is due to a commonly held belief that boys will not play with toys aimed at girls. By exploring this, Godwin critically interrogates the restrictive gendering of specific Doctor Who merchandise. Her analysis contrasts the mainstream thirteenth Doctor Barbie with Big Chief Studios’ high-end, niche ‘1:6 figure’ collectible, arguing that this collectible is masculinized (and aestheticized) through its marketing emphases on physical ‘fabrication’ and sculpture, as opposed to exnominating those who worked on fashioning the figure’s clothing fabrics and their designs. While the Chris Chibnall / Jodie Whittaker era may often have been progressive on screen, highly gendered terms for at least some of its paratextual merchandise suggest that there are commercial and cultural limits which remain in play around Doctor Who’s transformations.

in Doctor Who – New Dawn
Lorna Jowett

Lorna Jewett posits that science fiction with its emphasis on defamiliarization and estrangement is inherently queer and examines the diversity of writers in the Chris Chibnall / Jodie Whittaker era of Doctor Who, arguing that this range leads to the potential for more inclusive representations of sexuality. Jewett explores the ‘casual queerness’ which follows on from the era’s statement of intent to become more inclusive and diverse. By looking at story choices and character dynamics, Jewett shows how series 11’s ensemble cast signals some of its new directions. It is further argued that series 11 and 12 offer visual cues that allow the audience to follow desire lines between characters, though the text draws clear limits to this (queerbaiting) – especially in relation to the Doctor and Yaz – and therefore remains constrained by tensions between progressive statements of intent and the constraints of mainstream television.

in Doctor Who – New Dawn
Essays on the Jodie Whittaker era

This book explores a new cultural moment in the history of the BBC TV series, Doctor Who: the casting of a female lead. Following the reveal that Jodie Whittaker would be the thirteenth Doctor, the series has been caught up in media and fan controversies – has it become ‘too political’? Has showrunner Chris Chibnall tampered disastrously with long-running continuity? And has the regendered thirteenth Doctor been represented differently from her predecessors? Analysing Whittaker’s era – up to and including Doctor Who’s responses to 2020’s first lockdown – this edited collection addresses how the show has been repositioned as a self-consciously inclusive brand. Featuring brand-new interview material with those working on-screen (series regular Mandip Gill and guest star Julie Hesmondhalgh) and those operating behind the scenes in crucial roles (Segun Akinola, composer of the current theme and incidental music), Doctor Who – New Dawn focuses on how the thirteenth Doctor’s era of spectacular TV has been created, and how it has diversified representations of queerness, race, and family. Moving beyond the television show itself, chapters also address fan responses to the thirteenth Doctor via memes, cosplay, and non-Anglophone translation. Finally, this collection looks at how the new ‘moment’ of Doctor Who has moved into gendered realms of merchandising, the commercial ‘experience economy’, and a paratextual neo-gift economy of Covid-19 lockdown reactions that were created by previous showrunners alongside Chris Chibnall. A vigorous new dawn for Doctor Who calls for rigorous new analysis – and the thirteen chapters gathered together here all respond adventurously to the call.