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Satoru Nagao

This chapter analyses the recent intensification of India-Japan security ties from the Japanese perspective. The chapter stresses the importance of the deepening dialogue between foreign and defence ministers and Japan’s now regular participation in naval exercises in the last few years. It argues that for Japan, the main rationale is geo-strategic, namely the changing US-China balance, because Japan is no longer certain that the US will continue to balance against China and support Japan’s interests in the region. This makes India a central ally initially for burden sharing with the United States in the Indian Ocean, for protecting sea-lanes of communication and eventually for collaborating with Japan to support South China Sea littoral countries. The shared values between the two countries, and the expectation that India is a status-quo power in South Asia, and has a long history of cooperation in international institutions, makes India a natural regional security partner.

in Japan's new security partnerships
Akiko Fukushima

This chapter analyses the recent intensification of EU-Japan security relations from a Japanese perspective. After two decades of relatively slow progress and a focus on economic and non-security ties, this chapter focuses on the potential impact of the most ambitious initiative to substantially deepen their security ties, namely the EU-Japan Strategic Partnership Agreement (SPA). With the SPA still under negotiation, this chapter asks how this agreement will most likely influence EU-Japan security cooperation, Japan’s potential contribution to EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) missions, EU-Japan cooperation on banning anti-personnel mines and limiting the illicit trade in small arms, and the significance of defence cooperation between France and the UK with Japan. It also assesses how China’s growing role in international affairs might impact the EU and Japan, and their current and future security cooperation.

in Japan's new security partnerships
Bjørn Elias Mikalsen Grønning

This chapter analyses the recent intensification of Japan-Vietnam security relations from a Japanese perspective. It demonstrates that the relationship has grown beyond a security talk shop since 2011, when relations began to develop markedly toward substantial cooperation, especially on maritime security, and today are on the verge of becoming militarily significant. This chapter argues that Japan’s incentive to develop this partnership is primarily to assist and induce Vietnam’s continued resistance against the rise of Chinese maritime power. The recent changes in Japan’s domestic security legislation potentially open new opportunities to further broaden and deepen bilateral maritime security cooperation, because they legally enable Japan to assist Vietnam militarily in some respects.

in Japan's new security partnerships
Renato Cruz De Castro

This chapter analyses Philippine-Japan security ties from the Philippine perspective. It examines the external and domestic factors behind their increased security cooperation and explores the status of this security partnership. It argues that China’s maritime expansion in East Asia negatively affected both Japan and the Philippines, which in turn led to a deepening of their security partnership. The chapter predicts that despite recent changes in the Philippine government, the Philippines has a strong interest in further deepening the security partnership with Japan.

in Japan's new security partnerships
Swee Lean Collin Koh

This chapter analyses the recent intensification of Japan-Vietnam security relations from the Vietnamese perspectives. It argues that for Vietnam, Chinese maritime expansion and territorial claims in the South China Sea are an important motivation to deepen security ties with Japan. This chapter examines how Vietnam has dealt with post-Cold War and contemporary maritime security challenges, and discusses Japan’s role in developing their bilateral maritime security partnership, before assessing the future trajectory of the Vietnam-Japan maritime security partnership.

in Japan's new security partnerships
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Philip Hammond

This chapter focuses on Operation Enduring Freedom: the US-led military action in Afghanistan, undertaken in response to the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the US. The 'war on terror' discourse which developed in the wake of 9/11 was more than just a way of framing the conflict in Afghanistan. Commentators have suggested that it was more like the Cold War framework, in that it purported to explain a host of domestic and international developments, and offered a comprehensive model for making sense of diverse events. Karim H. Karim said that previous US involvement in Afghanistan was 'hardly ever mentioned in the media, which instead presented the US as a savior for the long-suffering Afghans'. The Guardian saw some hope that the future direction of international intervention in Afghanistan might follow a more Blairite 'humanitarian' agenda.

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Richard Jackson

This chapter explains how the 'war on terrorism' consists of both practice and language, or discourse. Then, it suggests that discourses form the foundation for the practice by establishing the underlying assumptions, beliefs and knowledge. There are important and unambiguous connections between the language and the practice of counter-terrorism; critical discourse analysis permits people to analyse both the specific features of the language and the deeper relationship between discourse and the exercise of power. The chapter explores how the discourse affects the practice of the 'war on terrorism', particularly, how the language of counter-terrorism has consequences for the moral community, for democratic participation and for the practice of counter-terrorism. Additionally, the 'war on terrorism' as a geo-political and strategic project is as much driven by the internal logic and effect of the discourse as it is by concrete political events.

in Writing the war on terrorism
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De facto theorist or ‘commonwealthsman’?
Marco Barducci

After 1649, parliamentary authors have usually been distinguished as either 'de facto theorists' or 'commonwealthsmen'. De facto theory incorporated languages and ideas which are difficult to fit into current definitions of 'republicanism'. Nonetheless, the writings of Anthony Ascham, Francis Rous or John Dury were intended to support the rule of Parliament, and after January 1649 that meant the rule of republican government. The same combination of distinctive features and similarities between Ascham's and John Milton's writings could be found in Marchamont Nedham's The Case of the Commonwealth of England Stated the case of John Hall. From Rous to Hall, a surprisingly rich and varied range of ideas and values were used to support adhesion to the rule of Parliament and the Republic. These ideas were not inherently linked to a singular form of polity.

in Order and conflict
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Excerpts from key US speeches before the war in Iraq
James P. Pfiffner and Mark Phythian
in Intelligence and national security policymaking on Iraq
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Excerpts from key UK speeches and documents before the war in Iraq
James P. Pfiffner and Mark Phythian
in Intelligence and national security policymaking on Iraq