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Tax policy, Ireland and the EU
Sheila Killian

This chapter explores the impact of debates about control of taxation policy on the Irish–EU relationship. This is a debate which touches strongly on issues of economic nationalism, and again it particularly reflects Ireland’s reputation as the ‘state that is perhaps more closely allied than any other democracy with the interests of global transnational corporations’ (Fintan O’Toole, Irish Times, 30 August 2016). The chapter includes consideration of the controversial Apple case which brought the Irish government into conflict with the European Commission.

in Ireland and the European Union
Weighing up the impact of Brexit on Northern Ireland’s peace process
James Pow

The potential impact of Brexit on the peace process in Ireland is exceptionally important and is examined in this chapter. It starts by analysing the EU’s contribution to the peace process, noting how joint membership of the EU helped create a framework of cooperation between the UK and Ireland. It then looks at how Brexit has disrupted three delicate balances on which the peace agreement was built: those between the communities in Northern Ireland, those with the Republic of Ireland, and those with the UK.

in Ireland and the European Union
Economic relations between Ireland and the EU between the crash and Brexit
Patrick Gallagher
,
Fergal Rhatigan
, and
Seán Ó Riain

This chapter examines the economic relationship between Ireland and the EU over the decade from the financial crash to Brexit. This discussion is in the context of the globalised nature of the Irish economy. It argues that perceptions shifted from growing unease about the impact of the EU on the Irish economy after the financial crash to a renewed enthusiasm for and commitment to the EU as the primary economic framework for Ireland following Brexit.

in Ireland and the European Union
Eamonn O'Kane

Downing Street Declaration; decommissioning; John Major; Albert Reynolds; Brendan Duddy; backchannel; Tony Blair; Martin McGuinness; George Mitchell; IRA ceasefire

in The Northern Ireland peace process
Eamonn O'Kane

Brexit; Boris Johnson; backstop; Northern Ireland protocol; the Irish border; European Union; Theresa May; legacy; Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI); Irish unity

in The Northern Ireland peace process
Eamonn O'Kane

decommissioning; Royal Ulster Constabulary; David Trimble; Holy Cross School; Ian Paisley; John Hume; Tony Blair

in The Northern Ireland peace process
Negotiating the Agreement, 1997–1998
Eamonn O'Kane

decommissioning; George Mitchell; Good Friday Agreement/GFA; Mo Mowlam; Ian Paisley; David Trimble; Tony Blair; Bertie Ahern; Gerry Adams; John Hume

in The Northern Ireland peace process
From armed conflict to Brexit
Author:

The peace process in Northern Ireland has been widely praised for resolving the longest running post-war conflict in Europe. However, there is often misunderstanding about what happened in Northern Ireland and why. Drawing on a wide range of sources, this book offers an analysis of the origin, development and outcome of the peace process. It argues that the changes that Northern Ireland experienced from the early 1990s can only be understood if they are examined in the context of the time in which they occurred. It challenges some of the criticisms of the peace process that have emerged in recent years and argues these are based on either a misunderstanding of the purpose of the process or on information that was not available to the main actors at the time. The peace process was primarily an attempt to persuade those groups using violence to abandon their armed campaigns, rather than a specific attempt to create a fairer or more just society. The question became how this could be achieved and at what cost? The book charts and explains the ongoing challenges faced by Northern Ireland as it seeks to transition from a conflict to a post-conflict society. It highlights the lack of trust that has been a continuing and, at times, debilitating feature of the region’s politics since 1998. It concludes by considering the extent to which Brexit offers a challenge that might undermine the progress that has been made during Northern Ireland’s ‘messy’ and unpredictable peace process.

Eamonn O'Kane

peace process; republicanism; loyalism; Ulster Unionism; defeat thesis; stalemate; pan-nationalism

in The Northern Ireland peace process
Eamonn O'Kane

St Andrews Agreement; DUP; Ian Paisley; Arlene Foster; Martin McGuinness; Renewable Heat Initiative (RHI); dissident republicans; flags protest; Colum Eastwood; Mike Nesbitt

in The Northern Ireland peace process