Browse

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 46 items for :

  • Manchester Digital Textbooks x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The 1953 Italian fair at Galeries Lafayette
Florence Brachet Champsaur

Drawing on the archives of the Galeries Lafayette, this chapter presents a case study of the 1953 Italian fair, a commercial event offering Parisian customers the very best Italian imports, from food to textiles. The case study allows us to assess the extent of influence on the French department store of American management practices and the building of a new European commercial network. This case study of the 1953 Galeries Lafayette Italian fair is a suitable starting-point for the historical study of those fashion professionals working behind the scenes. In addition, the chapter covers the post 1945 period, a less thoroughly researched moment in the historiography of retailing. It offers an opportunity to respond to the call of Victoria de Grazia, who underlined that 'the evolution of modern systems of distribution is astonishingly understudied'. The success of R. H. Macy's Italian promotion had a powerful impact on Galeries Lafayette.

in European fashion
The cases of Kaihara and Japan Blue, 1970–2015
Rika Fujioka
and
Ben Wubs

In the 1950s and 1960s, blue jeans became a symbol of youth protests against the conformity of their parents. Vintage and designer denim became an important part of the global fashion system. The two case studies in this chapter draw on interviews with the CEOs of Kaihara and Japan Blue and documents from both the companies. The examples fit perfectly within a comparative, historical study of Japanese premium denim and jeans. The case studies demonstrate that producing denim, the fabric, is a different story and needs a different strategy from producing jeans, the garment. They are also closely related because of interdependence between the two industries; Kaihara, for example, dyes Japan Blue's woven cotton. An in-depth historical analysis of these two cases provides valuable insight into the historical competitiveness of denim and jeans manufacturing in Japan over the last five decades.

in European fashion
Tereza Kuldova

This chapter investigates why the luxury Indian fashion industry embrace the 'ethical sell' when the luxury fashion houses in the West did not seem to utilize it to an equal degree. It also investigates why ethical fashion in the West remains a small segment while in India the top designers are using the 'ethical sell' as an effective and central marketing strategy. The chapter discusses the career track of Indian fashion designer Samant Chauhan, which exemplifies crucial element of the global fashion system and the influential place of the European fashion capitals within it. It explores why ethical fashion has become so pronounced among Indian business elites, and deals with a confluence of factors, which pertain to businesses on a global scale and to local struggles specific to the industry. These invocations of 'ethicality' and the insertion of morality into the market are a consequence of interconnected crises of legitimacy.

in European fashion
Abstract only
The creation of a global industry

The fashion industry has long been a particular victim of the borders between academic disciplines that have pursued their own agendas and employed their own language with minimum dialogue with outsiders. This book represents a sustained interdisciplinary and global assault on such artificial constraints which have constrained much research on the fashion industry in the past. Many historical studies have heavily focused on the ecosystems of Paris, Milan, New York, and other fashion hubs. It breaks new grounds as the authors trace the actors involved, from the luxury conglomerate LVMH to retailers, including the iconic Swedish firm H&M. The book also emphasizes the work of fashion professionals who worked behind-the-scenes as intermediaries: trendsetters, retail buyers, stylists, art directors, advertising executives, public relations agents, brand managers, and entrepreneurs. It examines the transition from the old system to the new in a series of case studies grouped around three major themes. The book deals with the transformation of Paris from a couture production centre to a creative hub for design and brand management. It examines the special role of retailers and retail brands in promoting European fashion, with reference to transnational exchanges between Europe, America, and the wider world. The book explores seminal developments in a select group of global fashion hubs on the European periphery or entirely outside of Europe, and their roles in critiquing the mainstream fashion system with heritage marketing, vintage aesthetics, ethical brands, and local styles.

Regina Lee Blaszczyk
and
Véronique Pouillard

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book examines the postwar couture industry post World War II. It considers four major fashion retailers, Galeries Lafayette in Paris, I. Magnin in San Francisco, William Filene's Sons Company in Boston, and H&M in Stockholm, within the context of the revival of European fashion after World War II and the global democratization of fashion in our own time. The book looks to alternative visions of the European fashion system that have bubbled up in unexpected places. It highlights the relationship between core and periphery, and provides a discussion of the global context for value creation. The book also examines a constellation of people and places that are important to the European fashion system, even though they are at quite some distance, either geographically or symbolically, from any European fashion capital.

in European fashion
Abstract only
How Swedish entrepreneurial culture and social values created fashion for everyone
Ingrid Giertz-Mårtenson

The Swedish clothing company H&M is one of the key players in the creation of accessible fashion for an international clientele. This chapter discusses issues that affect H&M's approach to fashion, its business strategy and history, which tries to place the success of a global company in a national perspective, and to understand what a business with Swedish values is. It is also about fashion's relationship to society and culture, seen through the development of a Swedish company that has become a global giant. The history of H&M is the story of how founder Erling Persson's entrepreneurship and strong values have survived. H&M has been singled out as a successful representative of the fast fashion business model in the international fashion industry. The chapter examines the reality behind this idea, and investigates whether the company's core values and production realities support or contradict this concept.

in European fashion
Abstract only
Storytelling and organizing creativity in luxury and fashion
Pierre-Yves Donzé
and
Ben Wubs

During the 1980s, the European luxury and fashion business experienced a period of radical change. The French holding company Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH), the world's largest fashion and luxury group, is an excellent embodiment of this organizational change. This chapter is a case study of LVMH exploring the evolution of the fashion and luxury industries, entrepreneurship and innovation, and the management of creativity. The LVMH example is especially important because it links Paris to global markets for luxury goods, the largest of which is China. The chapter assesses the narratives generated by the company and by the mass media about craft heritage and the 'genius' of fashion creators. Acknowledging that creativity is a major resource for LVMH, it considers the ways in which the creative process is socially constructed through storytelling. Moreover, the chapter addresses the question of how and where the LVMH group organizes the innovation process.

in European fashion
The case of Guy and Arnaud de Lummen
Johanna Zanon

This chapter examines sleeping beauties in the luxury fashion industry. The term 'sleeping beauty' is used to describe a Parisian haute couture brand that, once world-renowned but long dormant, has been rediscovered and reintroduced as a brand in the contemporary market. Drawing upon the conceptual tool elaborated by Pierre Bourdieu, the chapter analyses the cases of two entrepreneurs, Guy de Lummen and his son Arnaud de Lummen, whose investment in dormant fashion firms exemplifies the sleeping beauty phenomenon. It shows how the father-and-son team appropriated the objectified cultural capital of sleeping beauty brands, both materially and symbolically, first, by buying the legal rights to use them, and second, by acquiring the knowledge necessary to commercialize new products. The chapter builds upon a wide range of unpublished sources, including interviews with Arnaud de Lummen, records of the family's firms, and material and objects held in public institutions.

in European fashion
Haute couture and design management in the postwar era
Véronique Pouillard

This chapter explores the struggles of postwar couture from three focal points. First, it focuses on the dissemination of Paris couture through the development of agreements with domestic French manufacturers to reproduce couture lines for a wider audience. Next, the chapter addresses the relationship between the couturiers and the French government, and the politics of subventions granted by the state to haute couture during the 1950s. Haute couture catered to exclusive clients, expecting its designs to trickle down from the top and to be imitated by the lower strata of society. Finally, the chapter examines how entrepreneurs in the couture business sought to protect their portfolios of intellectual property rights in the years around the signature of the Treaty of Rome, 1957, which created the foundation for European integration through the formation of the Common Market. These major developments emerged against the backdrop of the development of the welfare state.

in European fashion
Shiona Chillas
,
Melinda Grewar
, and
Barbara Townley

This chapter analyses culture and enterprise with reference to the Scottish textiles, tartan and tweed. It considers how rhythms of culture and enterprise are accommodated in the practices of designers, and operated in the production process itself. The chapter investigates the 'fashion as fast' and 'textiles as slow' opposition by examining where and how the material artefacts are produced; the interactions between textile producers and fashion designers; and how and where the symbolic capital of textiles and fashion is manifest and maintained. It focuses on the symbolic capital of textiles as producers reach back in time to valorize traditional patterns, modes of production, and traditional garments to express the timeless qualities of the cloths. The chapter also focuses on how this is parlayed into economic capital in the sphere of enterprise. It discusses symbolic capital in the field of fashion and the place of time in strategies of distinction.

in European fashion