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Political, cultural, green
Andrew Patrizio

This chapter finds support for a cultural politics of nonhierarchies, networks and flows in writings that follow from early anarchist and social ecology contributions and in more general works on green political thought. The chapter calls attention to the resurgence of nonhierarchical political formations from various perspectives and how they have shaped artistic practices and art historical methodologies. What ends up foregrounded are the transversal, interlinked and mutually influencing parts of our social body. Drawing on some of the content in Part I and the Conclusion, this chapter analyses these approaches methodologically and speculates on how the discipline of art history might productively continue to adopt scholarly rich, egalitarian political positions, and inform a fully ‘green’ political ideology.

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

Building on canonical, largely male writers thus far discussed, this chapter shows the rich vein of theory, political philosophy and activism in ecofeminism and queer theory. It explores the relatively under-discussed intellectual boundary between the major scholars in ecofeminism and those in feminist art history. Pioneering work in ecofeminism becomes powerful in understanding the themes of domination and hierarchy that lie at the heart of The ecological eye. Queer theory too stands as a productive extension of the challenge to domination and hierarchy that runs throughout the book and so helps to delineate rich territory for supporting a transversal ecological imaginary in art history.

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

This chapter draws on the work of many canonical art historians and weighs their contribution, implied or explicit, to an ecocritical art history. It looks at the standard introductions to art historical theory and method that are in circulation, mining them for ecological potential and seeking out a positive case for environmental concerns of various types nascent within the discipline. Yet is also problematises the fact that none of these introductions explicitly asserts ecological imperatives. The conclusion of this chapter is that art history is well placed to expand into a critical environmental humanities whilst drawing selectively on existing work in the discipline.

in The ecological eye
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Andrew Patrizio
in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

Much anarchist and social ecologist writing argues for a degree of connectedness between other animal life and insensate bodies and materials on earth. In this vein, a new strand of nonhierarchical, vitalist political ontology, termed ‘new materialism’, takes mutualism and ethics more radically beyond the human. This chapter looks briefly at prehistories, within vitalist traditions, before turning to recent contributions to this dynamic field such as by Barad, Bennett, Grosz and in the anthology by Coole and Frost, New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics (2010) among many others. New materialism seeks to take politics and philosophy to new levels of nonhierarchical awareness. This chapter argues for its potential (along with its variants) within the history of art, given new materialism’s apparent productive encounters within other humanities disciplines. The perhaps surprising conclusion for art history, as a discipline dominated by hierarchies, markets, monetisation and value systems, is that this is an intellectual trajectory that art historians should positively engage with and make their own contributions.

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio
in The ecological eye
Anarchism, social ecology and art
Andrew Patrizio
in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio
in The ecological eye
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Amy Bryzgel

Roselee Goldberg argues that artists in Eastern Europe utilised body art because it left little trace of the unofficial and experimental creative activity that it engendered. This chapter examines the manner in which artists from the East used their bodies in performance to navigate the varying degrees of state control over artistic production and cultivate their own forms of individual integration and self-expression. The artist's body can undergo its most significant transformation by being pushed to its physical limits, sometimes to the point of significant harm or near-destruction. Branislav Jakovljevic has written about the performances that took place at the Student Culture Centre in the context of the protests in Belgrade, among other places across the world, in 1968. The Autoperforatsions artisten had consistently staged visceral, destructive and absurdist performances and actions throughout the 1980s in Dresden.

in Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960
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Amy Bryzgel

Artists working in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe during the communist period adopted performance art as a free-form, open-ended means of expression. Performance art gave voice to concepts, relationships and actions that otherwise would not have been possible in the official realm of art or in the public sphere. In the post-communist period, artists continued to embrace the experimental nature of performance. Performance art created under the communist and post-communist systems manifests other points of continuity as well. Just as East European artists working under communism faced potentially severe repercussions for actions deemed politically or otherwise subversive, so, too, have their post-communist successors, as the controversy surrounding Pussy Riot, among other examples, attests. The fact that performance art continues to be relevant in the region attests to its lingering efficacy in both the world of art and the public sphere.

in Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960