The Eloquence of Incompletion
Cedric C. Brown

This article gives new information on the so-called Letter-book of John, Viscount Mordaunt (Rylands MS GB 133) beyond that in RHS Camden Series LXIX, identifies the likely scribe, and dates the transcription to late 1660. It shows how the large format book was created to record the heroic role played by Mordaunt and his wife Elizabeth (née Carey) in the achievement of Restoration, and how the unfinished state of the textual project adds to our knowledge of the social and political difficulties experienced by Mordaunt, a client of Clarendon. Beyond its historiographical value for understanding the activities of the plenipotentiary, the book helps to tell the story of Mordaunt’s headlong career from his treason trial in 1658 to his impeachment in 1667, the extraordinary supportive agency of Elizabeth, including managing secret correspondence in 1659, the complexities of the Mordaunts’ friendship with John Evelyn, and their loyalty to their fallen patron Clarendon extending to exile in Montpellier in 1668.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Ian Wood

In the early years of the twentieth century, Professor Karl Lamprecht was a powerful and controversial figure in German academia, offering a universal interpretation of history that drew on an eclectic mix of politics, economics, anthropology and psychology. This article explores Mark Hovell’s experiences of working with Lamprecht at the Institut für Kultur- und Universalgeschichte [Institute for Cultural and Universal History] in Leipzig between 1912 and 1913, while also situating Hovell’s criticisms of the Lamprechtian method within wider contemporary assessments of Lamprecht’s scholarship.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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The Life and Legacy of Mark Hovell
Christopher Godden
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Christopher Godden

During the academic year 1912–13, Mark Hovell studied and taught at Professor Karl Lamprecht’s Institut für Kultur- und Universalgeschichte (Institute for Cultural and Universal History) in Leipzig. During his time there, Hovell wrote regularly to his fiancée, Fanny Gately, and to his mentor, Professor Thomas Tout. This article focuses on several of Hovell’s letters held at the John Rylands Library, presenting his thoughts and observations on aspects of social, political and academic life in Germany shortly before the outbreak of the First World War.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Mark Hovell and Histories of Chartism
Malcolm Chase

This article provides the first detailed account of Mark Hovell’s The Chartist Movement, focusing on the overall achievement of the work as published in 1918, contemporary reactions to the circumstances of its production, and the ways in which Hovell’s research cemented twentieth-century dominant narratives around the rise and fall of Chartism. The article also offers a counterfactual evaluation of Hovell’s manuscript, focusing on the probable direction of his vision of Chartism, and suggesting how the work completed by Hovell (had he lived) might have looked compared with the version eventually produced by Tout.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Mark Hovell’s The Chartist Movement
Michael Sanders

Chartist historiography is inevitably inflected by the political desires of its authors. This desire, combined with the contingent nature of history, imparts a fictive dimension to Chartist historiography. In support of these claims, this article applies the literary concepts of plot and character to Mark Hovell’s The Chartist Movement (1918). It argues that Hovell’s political desire leads him to construct a tragic and entropic plot for Chartism, which is often contradicted by his own assessment of the movement’s vitality. Similarly, Hovell’s plotting is also driven by his reading of Chartism as a conflict between two characters, a flawed hero (Lovett) and a villain (O’Connor). The article closes with a close reading of Hovell’s characterisation of O’Connor, which demonstrates the skill with which he interweaves fact and interpretation.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Patricia Clare Ingham

Taking inspiration from a famous manuscript illumination of Fortunes Wheel, this article argues for a reconsideration of diverse uses of repetition legible in accounts of medieval curiosity, and in the association of curiosity with the figure of the ape.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Paul Fouracre and Sasha Handley
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Elizabeth Gow and Julianne Simpson
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library