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Quentin Falk

Chapter 9 recounts Charles Crichton’s activities through the seventies. This was the first decade of his career in which he did not work on a feature film. Instead, he focused on television. His first productions were episodes of the children’s adventure sitcom Here Come the Double Deckers and the Shirley MacLaine vehicle Shirley’s Hour. These were followed by stints working on two Gerry Anderson projects, the derivative action show The Protectors and the more ambitious Space: 1999. Between 1974 and 1976 Crichton directed fourteen of the latter’s forty-eight episodes – more than any other contributor. But the programme he was to be most attached to in later years was ITV’s Black Beauty, inspired by but not based on the classic book, for which he directed eighteen episodes. The decade ended with Crichton realising his first successful collaboration with John Cleese, via Cleese’s production company Video Arts, which had embarked on a project creating professional training films with a comedic style. Crichton would go on to direct twenty-seven Video Arts titles over the next sixteen years.

in Charles Crichton
Quentin Falk

Chapter 7 covers Charles Crichton’s activities in the early sixties. After a brief stint working on The Birdman of Alcatraz for Hollywood production company Hecht-Hill-Lancaster, Crichton found himself helming The Battle of the Sexes (1960) for Michael Balcon’s new company, Bryanston Films. This adaptation of the James Thurber short story ‘The Catbird Seat’ was generally well received, with particular credit going to Peter Sellers’s performance in the lead role. Crichton worked for Bryanston again on The Boy Who Stole a Million (1960), an Anglo-Spanish adventure comedy that was welcomed by American critics but fared less well at home. A three-year stint directing episodes of the undistinguished ITC series Man of the World followed, before Crichton returned to the big screen with The Third Secret (1964), an ambitious but flawed thriller that is notable for providing Judi Dench, already a star of the stage, her first film role at the age of twenty-nine. More TV work followed with the series Danger Man and The Human Jungle.

in Charles Crichton
Quentin Falk

Chapter 8 follows Charles Crichton’s career through the second half of the sixties. He made only one feature film during this period, the thriller He Who Rides a Tiger (1965). Based on the experiences of cat burglar Peter Gulston (aka Peter Scott), the film was written by Trevor Peacock and starred Tom Bell and Judi Dench. The production was plagued by money problems and the erratic behaviour of producer David Newman, and the reviews were mixed. It would be more than two decades before Crichton directed another feature. The subsequent years were filled with TV work, notably on The Avengers, Man in a Suitcase and The Strange Report. There was, however, a suggestion of things to come when Crichton was briefly considered as director for a project being developed by future Monty Python’s Flying Circus stars John Cleese and Graham Chapman. The film, then titled Rentasleuth, went ahead without him, appearing in 1972 under the title Rentadick. It was a total flop, but the short-lived collaboration between Crichton, Cleese and Chapman would go on to bear fruit almost twenty years later with A Fish Called Wanda.

in Charles Crichton

Featuring more than 6,500 articles, including over 350 new entries, this fifth edition of The Encyclopedia of British Film is an invaluable reference guide to the British film industry. It is the most authoritative volume yet, stretching from the inception of the industry to the present day, with detailed listings of the producers, directors, actors and studios behind a century or so of great British cinema.

Brian McFarlane's meticulously researched guide is the definitive companion for anyone interested in the world of film. Previous editions have sold many thousands of copies, and this fifth instalment will be an essential work of reference for universities, libraries and enthusiasts of British cinema.

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Brian McFarlane and Anthony Slide

Featuring more than 6,500 articles, including over 350 new entries, this fifth edition of The Encyclopedia of British Film is an invaluable reference guide to the British film industry. It is the most authoritative volume yet, stretching from the inception of the industry to the present day, with detailed listings of the producers, directors, actors and studios behind a century or so of great British cinema.

Brian McFarlane's meticulously researched guide is the definitive companion for anyone interested in the world of film. Previous editions have sold many thousands of copies, and this fifth instalment will be an essential work of reference for universities, libraries and enthusiasts of British cinema.

in The Encyclopedia of British Film
Martin Barker, Clarissa Smith, and Feona Attwood

This penultimate chapter examines the various controversies surrounding Game of Thrones relating to issues of adaptation and to sex and violence, among other things. Focusing on the Red Wedding and the rape of Sansa Stark, it shows how participants spoke about scenes that they found memorable and those that made them feel uncomfortable or angry. The chapter examines how moments of shock generated by the series could be accepted and appreciated as characteristics of ‘extreme storytelling’, whereas angry responses were associated with rejection of the TV show’s storylines, aesthetics or politics. It explores in detail the characteristics of responses to Sansa’s rape, placing these in the wider context of the way that debates about representations of violence – particularly sexual violence and ‘rape culture’ – have developed.

in Watching Game of Thrones
Martin Barker, Clarissa Smith, and Feona Attwood

How do we move from talking in vague terms about ‘the audience’, without falling into the vacuous opposite of saying that ‘everyone is different’? This chapter explains how the project’s qualiquantitative methodology, coupled with an idea developed from the sociologist Max Weber, enabled the identification of seven distinct kinds of audience for Game of Thrones, each with its own orientation to the TV show.

in Watching Game of Thrones
Martin Barker, Clarissa Smith, and Feona Attwood

A great deal of theoretical work, notably from media psychology and cognitive film theory, has addressed the ways that audiences relate to characters within fictional works. This chapter reviews the main tendencies within this work, before testing some of its main claims by close examination of the ways that the project’s respondents chose, and talked about, their favourite characters and favourite survivors (notably Tyrion Lannister, Jon Snow, Arya Stark, Daenerys Targaryen, Jaime Lannister, Sansa Stark, Petyr Baelish, Lord Varys, and Cersei Lannister). The results reveal the very complex ways that audiences affiliate with characters, doing so in highly patterned but also selective ways (sidelining uncomfortable features).

in Watching Game of Thrones
Martin Barker, Clarissa Smith, and Feona Attwood

Audience research has changed dramatically under the influence of cultural studies, with its emphasis on pleasures, meanings, identities and communities, along with its critique of quantitative ‘effects’ research. But a number of researchers have sought to overcome the limitations of the associated qualitative research methods by developing qualiquantitative methods. This chapter outlines how such a method – trialled in a number of earlier major projects – was deployed for Game of Thrones, and explains the analytic procedures that followed.

in Watching Game of Thrones
Martin Barker, Clarissa Smith, and Feona Attwood

This final chapter returns to questions of popular culture, imagination and fantasy and their connections to political activism and thought. Focusing on ‘unpredictability’, an element of quality TV and a key characteristic of the series, it examines how our seven types of audience member envisage different conceptions of ‘unpredictability’ and ‘futures’. Drawing on the notion of a ‘structure of feeling’ and in the context of the emergence of ‘Grimdark’ fantasy, the chapter explore ways of understanding audience responses of ‘relish’ and ‘anguish’ and what these suggest, both about Game of Thrones and broader questions about audience sensibility.

in Watching Game of Thrones