Browse

Meir Hatina

The chapter sketches a portrait of liberal writers after 1967, mapping their sources of inspiration and ideological emphases, and their contribution to Arab political thought. The chapter also places liberal writers in a historical context and identifies continuities and differences between them and the liberals of the early twentieth century.

in Arab liberal thought in the modern age
Abstract only
Debating Arab liberalism
Meir Hatina

This chapter provides a theoretical framework for defining liberalism and its features, criticizing prevailing attitudes in Western historiography, and reframing Arab liberalism.

in Arab liberal thought in the modern age
Abstract only
Toward an ethical vision
Meir Hatina

This chapter analyzes the attitudes of liberal thinkers in relation to Islam, with an emphasis on the Qur’an and the Prophet’s era, the hard core of Muslim collective memory throughout the ages. Liberal writers provided rich scholarship and dynamic interpretations of the sacred sources, based on scientific exploration of the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which Islam emerged in the seventh century

in Arab liberal thought in the modern age
Abstract only
An inspiring model
Meir Hatina

This chapter deals with liberal writings on Western culture, perceived as a source of inspiration and not only as a reservoir of conspiracies; on globalization, which was defined as a lever for Arab economic modernism; and on peace and coexistence with Israel, presented as an essential component in the promotion of Arab humanism.

in Arab liberal thought in the modern age
Abstract only
Methodological reflections
Marc Geddes
in Dramas at Westminster
Marc Geddes

This chapter ties together how contrasting interpretations of scrutiny affect accountability relationships. The core argument of this chapter is that scrutiny is dependent on fragile, although also sometimes very dense and effective, webs of accountability in the House of Commons. The argument develops in three steps. First, it looks at individual relationships between MPs to show that informal practices and networks that are fundamental to making scrutiny happen. It then applies these insights in the second section, where the chapter turns to the development of norms and values of committees. This is critical to establish goodwill on committees as well as – and perhaps most importantly – the construction of consensus in reports. Almost all policy impact on government by committees depends on these reports, and a lot of this influence is derived from their unanimity. The final section looks at the implications of all this to understanding accountability in the House of Commons, arguing that it is ‘webs of scrutiny’ that matter most in conducting scrutiny, rather than the institutional powers that committees have (or, more accurately, do not have).

in Dramas at Westminster
Marc Geddes

Little detailed research has been published on committee chairs. So, in this empirically unique chapter, analysis begins by locating the role of chair in their institutional context, including important reforms that have taken place in the UK Parliament in 2010 that have renewed chairs’ sense of authority. The chapter discusses the leadership role that chairs have adopted and how this affects select committees. The chapter argues that chairs have adopted different styles, but that this falls along a spectrum: either committee-orientated catalysts or leadership-orientated chieftains. The choices that chairs make affect their ability to lead their committee, building consensus, and representing Parliament. The chapter opens wider debates about institutional roles and leadership within legislatures. Moreover, given the 2017 election result, chairs of these committees are likely to play an important brokerage role that means this chapter will be a timely contribution to understanding their influence for a wider audience.

in Dramas at Westminster
Marc Geddes

The book returns to the key themes and questions raised in the opening chapters, and posits the wider conclusions that we can draw from the empirical research. First, and drawing on empirical sections, the chapter reflects on scrutiny in the UK Parliament, and re-emphasises the general themes of the book about the importance of beliefs, practices and dilemmas to explain select committee scrutiny in the House of Commons. Second, the chapter brings out wider cross-cutting themes of the book, including the effect of the Wright reforms to improve the effectiveness of Parliament and what this book tells us about the lives of politicians more generally. Finally, the book closes with the wider relevance of this book’s findings on representative democracy in the UK and the continuing challenges that the UK Parliament faces.

in Dramas at Westminster
Select committees and the quest for accountability
Author: Marc Geddes

Based on unprecedented access to the UK Parliament, this book challenges how we understand and think about accountability between government and Parliament. Using data from a three-month research placement, over 45 interviews and more, this book focuses on the everyday practices of MPs and officials to reveal how parliamentarians perform their scrutiny roles. Some MPs adopt the role of a specialist, while others the role of a lone wolf; some are there to try to defend their party while others want to learn about policy. Among these different styles, chairs of committees have to try to reconcile these interpretations and either act as committee-orientated catalysts or attempt to impose order as leadership-orientated chieftains. All of this pushes and pulls scrutiny in lots of competing directions, and tells us that accountability depends on individual beliefs, everyday practices, and the negotiation of dilemmas. In this way, MPs and officials create a drama or spectacle of accountability and use their performance on the parliamentary stage to hold government to account. This book offers the most up-to-date and detailed research on committee practices in the House of Commons, following a range of reforms since 2010. The findings add new dimensions to how we study and understand accountability through the book’s path-breaking empirical focus, theoretical lens, and methodological tools. It is an ideal book for anyone interested in how Parliament works.

Abstract only
Marc Geddes

This chapter explores one of the most understudied actors across legislatures: their staff. Little research has been published on the roles and interpretations of staff on scrutiny in the House of Commons, despite their permanent and vital role to carrying out accountability functions. This chapter briefly places staff in their organisational context, which has undergone significant reforms since 2014–15. It then explores the ways in which staff interpret their role, which is characterised by three facets: first, being hidden, i.e., the belief that clerks should not have a public-facing role; second, unparalleled service, i.e., the belief that clerks are in the service of democracy and must support the institution of Parliament in every way possible; and third, passionate impartiality, the belief that all MPs must be served equally. These facets of their role throw up a number of tensions, which are explored in the final section of the chapter.

in Dramas at Westminster