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This chapter contains the text of The History of the Most Serene Roger, first King of Sicily written by Abbot Alexander of Telese, translated and annotated by Graham A. Loud.

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily

This chapter contains the text of The Assizes (or Constitutions) of King Roger, translated and annotated by Graham A. Loud.

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily

This chapter contains the text of The Book of Roger written by Abû ‘Abdallâh al-Idrîsî, translated and annotated by Graham A. Loud.

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily

This chapter presents two texts describing the spectular extravagance of The Feast of the Pheasant at Lille in 1454 and the marriage feast of Charles the Bold and Margaret of York in 1468.

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530

This chapter contains the text of The Catalogue of the Barons, translated and annotated by Graham A. Loud.

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily

This chapter contains the text of The Chronicle of Falco of Benevento, translated and annotated by Graham A. Loud.

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily

This chapter contains the text of The Chronicle of St Clement of Casauria, translated and annotated by Graham A. Loud.

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily

This chapter contains an introduction and a selection of translated and annotated texts on Burgundian civic religion and the court. The involvement of Burgundian rulers in the religious life of their towns was regular, frequent and varied. The presence of the living duke in the city might mean disruption to the normal rhythms of urban religious activity. The role of the dukes in annual civic processions was usually as passive spectators. Their joining of guilds and fraternities in towns suggests participation that complemented rather than appropriated the religious activities of their urban subjects. The profusion of relics in towns and villages by the fifteenth century, and the vast number of smaller religious groupings of parishes and guilds suggests lay activity that secular and clerical authorities could react to but scarcely contain.

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Jousts, shooting fraternities and Chambers of rhetoric

This chapter contains an introduction and a selection of translated and annotated texts on Burgundian civic society and the court. The regular contests of jousters, archers and poets in towns of the Low Countries were among the most distinctive features of festive urban society in the fifteenth century. Jousting groups do not appear to have the same formal structures as religious fraternities; but their events would invariably involve attendance at a vigil and mass on the eve of jousting. Their membership demonstrates strong links with the civic government and the upper echelons of civic society. Civic accounts from the late thirteenth century, in several towns in Flanders and northern France, begin to make sporadic payments for jousting activity on their market places. Rhetoric competitions that explored religious themes could also serve as stages for the edification, spiritual and civic, of a wider audience within the town. Moreover, 'urban' rhetoricians could not be seen as 'court' ciphers; festive events rarely offered explicit support of Burgundian rule.

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Abstract only

This chapter contains a selection of translated and annotated texts on the Burgundian court. With the exception of a very small number of high-status guests and relatives, the many men and fewer women who attended court were there to serve the prince and enjoy his favour. The prince could not be present in any one city all the time, with the result that the growth of Burgundian power effectively reduced the number of princely courts within the Low Countries. Princes and their servants might enjoy rights of board and lodging in monastic institutions, but the expanding and increasingly demanding court was less likely to find suitable accommodation there than it had in the past.

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530