Open Access (free)

Steve Sohmer

This chapter reveals the identities of Quinapalus, the Vapians, Pigrogromitus, and the court jester behind Feste’s name. It’s Shakespeare at his word-playing best.

Open Access (free)

Steve Sohmer

This chapter explains how Shakespeare marshalled St. Paul’s Epistles to the Corinthians as the subtext for Twelfth Night.

Open Access (free)

Selling the lott ery to earn salvation

Journalism practice, risk and humanitarian communication

Series:

Jairo Lugo-Ocando and Gabriel Andrade

The news media creates regimes of pity in order to mobilise the public towards humanitarian causes. Such regimes of pity tend to obviate the power relations between those who suffer and the spectators. This chapter proposes a type of news coverage that creates a specific type of political solidarity and which does not reproduce the power relations that have been prevalent until now in most news narratives and humanitarian campaigns. It argues that journalism practice must adopt a view of ‘shared risk’ in which people embrace equally concerns about a common future. The notion of societal risk tends to create the type of collective uncertainty that brings about political action in ways that pity regimes do not.

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Security

Order and disorder

Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

In this chapter we examine the role Hollywood movies play in maintaining and representing national security. Our aim is to provide an outline of the category we label ‘security films’ and to sketch out some of the major divisions within that category. Security films – with their stories about society, nation, and community – alert us to how power relations concerning the government of nations and citizens are articulated. Here (and in the next three chapters), our attention turns to representations of security as either comforting (order) or as threatening and frightening (disorder/fear).

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Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

This chapter continues to explore intimate relationalities on screen by investigating the politics of social interconnection in terms of desire, love, and romance. We focus on rom-coms in particular. These mobilise political myths that naturalise and police heteronormative and hypermonogamous imperatives: gender polarisation and complementarity are reinforced, love’s mechanisms are represented as inevitable, and the search for love is elevated as any human being’s greatest quest.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Toby Fricker

This chapter looks at the portrayal of Syrian children in media coverage of the Za’atari refugee camp. It analyses how reporting on children’s issues evolved over a three-year period and the role of aid agencies in the newsgathering process. Media coverage of the camp moved from a hard news approach, where children were framed in what could be perceived a negative manner, to a features-led approach with deeper context and nuance to articles, presenting children as more actively and positively involved in camp life. The chapter argues that the relationship between humanitarian organisations and journalists can be mutually beneficial and result in reporting with deeper context and nuance, whilst better protecting children along the way.

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Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

In this concluding chapter we interrogate Hollywood’s global dominance in more detail. The chapter examines competing views on whether this domination might be celebrated, condemned, or more equivocally assessed in order to consider questions of film policy and issues related to cultural and political diversity. This provides an opportunity to summarise and assess Hollywood’s cultural politics in the light of responses from other locations and perspectives.

Open Access (free)

The recuperation of Galician pottery

Craft professions, cultural policies, and identity

Elena Freire Paz

In contemporary EU political discourses of rurality, rural zones are no longer regarded primarily as zones for the production of food. Instead, they are viewed in multifunctional terms: as partly aesthetic resources, areas for the conservation of biodiversity and the management (if not invention) of heritage, to be exploited for the boosting of agro- and eco-tourism and other leisure industries. Thus the Galician anthropologist Elena Freire shows how in the 1990s the Galician Autonomous Community (GAC), working in league with the EC, stimulated the revival of autochthonous pottery and paid for the unemployed to train as potters. After detailing the customary mode of pottery production in the area, which fell into abeyance in the 1960s, she discusses its differences with the revitalized form: the new potters do not come from the ranks of the traditional, long-established potter-families of the area; they do not enter extended apprenticeships but undergo brief accredited courses; their production is not oriented to everyday items of domestic use, but to mainly decorative items branded as ‘heritage’ in Galician nationalist terms.

Open Access (free)

Steve Sohmer

This book will come as a revelation to Shakespeare scholars everywhere. It reveals the identity of the playwright and Shakespeare’s colleague behind the mask of Jaques in As You Like It. It pinpoints the true first night of Twelfth Night and reveals why the play’s performance at the Inns of Court was a momentous occasion for shakespeare. It also the identities Quinapalus, the Vapians, Pigrogromitus and Feste, as well as the ‘Dark Lady’ of the Sonnets and the inspiration for Jessica in The Merchant of Venice. And it solves Shakespeare’s greatest riddle: the meaning of M.O.A.I. in Twelfth Night. In sum, this book reveals William Shakespeare as a far more personal writer than we have ever imagined.

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Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

Following on from the characterisation of the spectrum of socially critical films outlined in chapter 10, this chapter continues our examination of these films by considering the extent to which they offer any challenge to dominant power relations. The chapter summarises key debates concerning the political traction of socially critical movies. Though these films may open up possibilities for counter-hegemonic social commentary, our analysis demonstrates that this is by no means decided.