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Giuliana Chamedes identifies two distinct visions that characterized the ideological construct of the ‘Atlantic order’ for the post-war world: a liberal-democratic American and British narrative that helped the United States strengthen its political and economic ties with Europe so as to protect a shared democratic worldview; and another vision, advanced by the Holy See, a handful of European Christian Democratic leaders, and certain key American Catholic opinion-makers, which did not have ‘democracy’ as its endgame. Rather, it proposed to build a peaceful transnational post-war order through the reconstitution of the ‘Christian West’, an early-modern concept of the ‘Old and the New World’ which was defined as an imagined community built on a shared commitment to Christian principles. This move enabled them to embrace the ‘Atlantic Community’, all the while remaining wedded to a conservative, anti-liberal, and anti-communist worldview.

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered

The TransAtlantic reconsidered brings together established experts from Atlantic History and Transatlantic Studies – two fields that are closely connected in their historical and disciplinary development as well as with regard to the geographical area of their interest. Questions of methodology and boundaries of periodization tend to separate these research fields. However, in order to understand the Atlantic World and transatlantic relations today, Atlantic History and Transatlantic Studies should be considered together. The scholars represented in this volume have helped to shape, re-shape, and challenge the narrative(s) of the Atlantic World and can thus (re-)evaluate its conceptual basis in view of historiographical developments and contemporary challenges. This volume thus documents and reflects on the changes within Transatlantic Studies during the last decades. New perspectives on research reconceptualize how we think about the Atlantic World. At a time when many political observers perceive a crisis in transatlantic relations, critical evaluation of past narratives and frameworks will provide an academic foundation to move forward.

Private organizations and governmentality

In his chapter Giles Scott-Smith analyses the Transnational Transatlantic from a Foucauldian perspective. He posits the ‘overflow of the state’s role into new spaces of politics’ as a key development in this period: the Cold War Atlantic Community was much more than a structure described by the rationalist theory of political scientists, he argues. With the Anglo-American bond at its core, it was indeed a transnational public sphere that spanned the Atlantic. Scott-Smith suggests a combination of the history of mentalities and (new) governmentality.

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered

This chapter examines the relationship between Canberra and Tokyo from a distinctly Australian perspective by disaggregating the Australia-Japan bilateral relations from the simplistic ‘allies of the US’ context (‘quasi-alliance’) to demonstrate how the two countries have developed a hugely strengthened bilateral security relationship to a significant degree independent of the US context. It argues, that this so-called ‘strategic partnership’ is a new form of security alignment that does not neatly fit traditional alliance paradigms, before analysing the wider contexts within which the bilateral strategic partnership exists.

in Japan's new security partnerships
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in Japan's new security partnerships

This chapter analyses Japan’s Southeast Asian security partnerships from a Southeast Asian perspective. Japan’s re-entering East Asia with a combination of increasing trading ties and economic development (ODA) initiatives in the 1970s and 1980s, slowly furthered economic growth and prosperity in many East-Asian countries as well as Japan - a mutually beneficial relationship that largely remained un-securitized. Beginning with the second Abe administration in 2012, Japan began to include security components in a number of bilateral relations with countries in the region. This chapter divides countries in Southeast Asian countries by their level of economic dependence on China and their threat perception vis-à-vis China, which is the core factor in explaining the rationale for why and how they engage with Japan, and shapes Southeast perspectives of Japanese-Southeast Asian security partnerships.

in Japan's new security partnerships

This chapter analyses a practical case of EU-Japan out-of-area security cooperation, and the first example of operational security cooperation between the EU and Japan, namely the counter-piracy mission off the coast of Somalia. This chapter introduces the main reasons and different stages of involvement of the Japanese government, the MSDF and JCG in the Somalia counter-piracy mission. It then analyses the extent to which this mission provided opportunities for closer EU-Japan security cooperation, and what significance this case has for future EU-Japan security cooperation more broadly. It argues that this mission provided an ideal opportunity for Japanese government representatives and SDF personnel to learn the complexities of multilateral security coordination, and operational cooperation between European and Japanese forces, while simultaneously producing a deepening of trust and understanding.

in Japan's new security partnerships

This chapter analyses the recent intensification of EU-Japan security relations from a European perspective. While recognizing shortcomings, including the expectations gap between the EU and Japan that has frequently been problematized, this chapter emphasizes the significance of the recent changes in Japanese security policy, such as the 2013 National Security Strategy, as evidence that Japan does consider the EU and NATO to be important security partners. The chapter analyses the domestic debate and government initiatives, as well as Japan’s expectations for the EU-Japan Strategic Partnership Agreement (SPA), and the enablers and inhibitors of closer security ties. This chapter argues that while Japan Europe security cooperation has so far excluded hard security, the changing international security environment and a narrowing perceptions gap should allow deeper cooperation in non-traditional security fields, because Japan would benefit from the European experience of forging consensus in shaping international rules and norms.

in Japan's new security partnerships

This chapter analyses the recent intensification of India-Japan security ties from an Indian perspective. It argues, that given India’s long held position as the leader of the non-alignment movement, the turnaround of India-Japan security relations has been quite remarkable. The relationship now ranges from the sale of amphibious aircraft and civilian nuclear cooperation to Japan becoming a permanent member in the Malabar naval exercise. The chapter identifies the shared core strategic interests as the area of energy security, the security of Sea-Lanes of Communication (SLOCs) in the Indian Ocean region and addressing the power disequilibrium in Asia. She argues, that India’s growing economic power has made India an increasingly important regional and global player, and building security partnerships with major powers in the region and throughout the world are a major tool for realizing the country’s potential on regional and global stages. Since 2000, Japan has become one of India’s most trusted partners in the region and an essential part of India’s so-called “Look East” and “Act East” foreign policy doctrine, and the chapter analyses India’s incentives to further deepen its security ties with Japan.

in Japan's new security partnerships
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in Japan's new security partnerships