Open Access (free)

Embedding community–university partnerships

Science shops and policy development

Series:

Eileen Martin, Emma McKenna, Henk Mulder and Norbert Steinhaus

This chapter considers the role of science shops in helping to develop policy to support community engagement within universities, both at the European level and at the country level. It discusses lessons learned by science shops in embedding community-university partnerships in policy, with a view to enhancing their sustainability. A science shop provides independent, participatory research support in response to concerns experienced by civil society. Science shop practitioners recognized the potential links between their work, which aimed to democratize science with the wider European Commission (EC) Science and Society agenda. Attempts have been made by science shops in different countries to either capitalize on current public and institutional policy where it exists or to create a policy context where it does not exist. EC support has also enabled some science shops to make stronger arguments for support at national and local levels.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Matthew M. Heaton

This chapter examines the role that Elder Dempster played in transporting so-called ‘lunatics’ between the United Kingdom and British West African colonies in the first half of the twentieth century. Many Europeans inhabiting the colonies and many more colonial subjects traveling abroad in the UK and other West African territories succumbed to mental illnesses while far from home. When this occurred and the patient was deemed likely to benefit from repatriation, Elder Dempster was typically the agent charged with providing transport. As such, Elder Dempster frequently had to negotiate with the Colonial Office about the practicalities of transporting lunatics. The cost of transport and who was to pay, the types of accommodations necessary for mentally ill passengers, and considerations of liability all had to be orchestrated to the satisfaction of the commercial shipping giant. This chapter argues that the relationship between Elder Dempster and the British government represents an example of the importance of public-private cooperation in the maintenance of the medical geography of Empire, even as it reveals significant tensions underlying such cooperation. In so doing, it helps to move the historical study of psychiatry in colonial Africa into a broader engagement with its international, transnational and commercial influences.

Abstract only

Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

Within the notion of security, order and disorder are twin concepts. When the emphasis is on security as order (as in war movies), the antagonist or enemy is rarely represented in any detail. By contrast, the movies explored in this chapter attend to order’s necessary counterpoint: security as disorder. The focus shifts to that which generates fear, the scary ‘them’ or ‘it’. This chapter introduces ‘fear films’ to illustrate how movies not usually considered to be ‘political’ address power relations through their representations of threat and its containment. We discuss the history and meaning of ‘fear films’ across three sources of disorder: strangers, disasters, and monsters.

Open Access (free)

Steve Sohmer

This chapter endorses the identification of Emilia Bassano Lanier as the ‘Dark Lady’ of Shakespeare’s Sonnets … and the inspiration of Jessica in The Merchant of Venice.

Open Access (free)

Curricular and pedagogical impacts of community-based research

Experiences from higher education institutions

Series:

Felix M. Bivens

This chapter examines the extent to which community-based research (CBR) programmes at four higher education institutions (HEIs) have impacted the curriculum and pedagogies of the institutions themselves. It provides a review of these four programmes, supplying some background on the CBR programmes and their evolution, and detailing some areas where the growth of these programmes has had an impact on aspects of the institution's curricula and/or pedagogy. The four programmes are: the Master's in Participation (MAP) at the UK's Institute of Development Studies (IDS), and the Community University Partnership Programme at the University of Brighton (CUPP). It also includes the outreach programme at Sewanee, University of the South (US), and the Programa de Investigacion Interdisciplinario Desrarrollo Humano en Chiapas (Interdisciplinary Research Programme on Human Development in Chiapas) at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (UAM), Mexico.

Abstract only

Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

This book interrogates the interplay of cultural and political aspects of contemporary Hollywood movies. Using ‘security’ films dealing with public order and disorder (Part I), romantic comedies and other movies presenting intimate relationalities (Part II), socially engaged films offering overtly critical messages (Part III), and analysis of Hollywood’s global reach and impact (Part IV), it articulates and illustrates an original cultural politics approach to film. The book employs an expanded conception of ‘the political’ to enquire into power relations in public, private, and policy arenas in order to advance a new framework and methodology for cultural politics. It demonstrates how movies both reflect and produce political myths that largely uphold the status quo as they shape our dreams, identities, and selves.

Open Access (free)

Crossing the divide

Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

Series:

Yolana Pringle

This chapter examines collaborations between mission and government doctors in colonial Uganda. Drawing on records from the Church Missionary Society and Uganda's District Archives, it considers the everyday dealings between mission doctors and the colonial government at Mengo Hospital, the formal co-opting of mission doctors into government service in the 1920s, and the changing nature of medical work in Uganda from the 1930s. It argues that the relationship between 'missionary' and 'government' medical work was never clearly defined, and that missionaries and colonial administrators reacted to local circumstances, formulating guidelines in a largely ad hoc manner. It suggests that the complexity of the relationship between mission and government doctors means that neither missionary nor colonial medicine should be considered in isolation.

Open Access (free)

The corporate karma carnival

Offline and online games, branding and humanitarianism at the Roskilde Festival

Series:

Lene Bull Christiansen and Mette Fog Olwig

This chapter asks whether it is possible to harness the powers of ‘the popular’ and media culture in the service of humanitarianism. There is a need to critically balance an analysis of the potentially progressive and/or problematic aspects of a popularised humanitarian event. Exploring the energies that are at play in the popular ‘carnival’ of the Danish Roskilde Festival, this chapter examines how the carnivalesque can function both as a form of corporate branding and as a means to destabilise the status quo identified with a negatively branded segment of the population. The chapter also analyses the expansion of the festival into cyberspace, and the offline–online interconnectivity of the festvial’s humanitarian events

Open Access (free)

Series:

Jorge Téllez Carrasco and José Blanes Jiménez

In the Chiquitania region of Bolivia, precious woods are products of high value that can be acquired from communities through local intermediaries at very low prices. Timber buyers acquire timber from people and communities through a system of loans and exchanges that often disadvantage small producers In 2003, the governments of Bolivia and Spain agreed to undertake a forestry development project in the Chiquitania region. The Chiquitania Forestry development project was undertaken within the VII Joint Hispano-Bolivian Cooperation Commission. In Bolivia, the Forestry Law gives municipalities responsibility for promoting local forestry development activities. The project involved a wide range of participants. To facilitate the adoption of a research-action approach, project coordination was undertaken by a Centro Boliviano de Estudios Multidisciplinarios (CEBEM) researcher. This facilitated the establishment of strategies for monitoring social interaction, support and methodological design.

Open Access (free)

Series:

José Blanes Jiménez and Edgar Antonio Pabón

Under the coordination of Centro Boliviano de Estudios Multidisciplinarios (CEBEM), support for municipal management of indigenous communities was chosen as a key project objective in Bolivia. CEBEM signed a cooperation agreement with the Municipality of Jesus de Machaca to develop a research project, together with the indigenous authorities, to strengthen institutions and spread their experiences. Although the European Union (EU) project has ended, a series of activities continue in the shape of collaboration between CEBEM and the municipality with the aim of identifying steps for collaboration, investments, webpage development and intercultural dialogues through the Intercultural Relations Platform. EU-funded project was approved by the indigenous peoples, peasants and Aboriginals of three countries: Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. The general objective of the project was to build capacity for territorial management on the part of the authorities and their organizations.