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The big picture

The ‘metropole’ and peripheral ‘others’

Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

In this last Part of the book we turn to global agendas. Chapter 12 reflects on the current state of the filmic ‘metropole’ and specifically Hollywood’s cultural politics in the context of its global reach and impact. We ask, in this chapter, whether cultural globalisation is a matter for concern.

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Beyond the state

The Colonial Medical Service in British Africa

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Edited by: Anna Greenwood

A collection of essays about the Colonial Medical Service of Africa in which a group of distinguished colonial historians illustrate the diversity and active collaborations to be found in the untidy reality of government medical provision. The authors present important case studies in a series of essays covering former British colonial dependencies in Africa, including Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zanzibar. These studies reveal many new insights into the enactments of colonial policy and the ways in which colonial doctors negotiated the day-to-day reality during the height of Imperial rule in Africa. The book provides essential reading for scholars and students of colonial history, medical history and colonial administration.

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Steve Sohmer

This chapter explains why Twelfth Night must begin with 1.2 rather than 1.1, and cites eighteenth- to nineteenth-century productions as conclusive evidence.

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An architecture understood

Effective support structures for community– university partnerships

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Edward T. Jackson, Letlotlo M. Gariba and Evren Tok

Good architectural design is fundamental to the successful construction, maintenance and liveability of a home. Likewise, the appropriate architecture is necessary in instituting policies and programmes that deepen, broaden, improve and sustain community-university research partnerships. The good news is that much is known about how to design effective support structures to foster and nurture these partnerships. This chapter reviews ten proven examples of such structures, all drawn from the Global North. These structures operate variously at the macro (national or multinational), meso and micro levels. The chapter discusses strategies and tools for evaluating partnerships that can be used by support structures. Finally, the chapter addresses the question of how the Global South can institute support structures to promote community-university research partnerships in poor emerging countries, building on the experience of the North.

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Alternative countrysides

Anthropological approaches to rural Western Europe today

Edited by: Jeremy MacClancy

In the last three decades the anthropology of Western Europe has become almost exclusively an anthropology of urban life. The anthropology of rural life in Western Europe has been progressively neglected. Yet, just because cities concentrate people who continue to produce new and unexpected forms of social organization does not mean rurality becomes the emptying home of a tired traditionalism. Far from it. Since the city is only defined by opposition to the countryside, and since rural movements have urban effects, we cannot ignore the changes taking place in hamlets, villages, and rural towns throughout Western Europe. They are a integral part and parcel of life in Europe today. The key aim of this book is to redress this academic imbalance, by examining some of the central changes in the rural zones of contemporary Western Europe. In particular, most contributors look at the newcomers to these areas and the rainbow variety of effects they are having. The ‘alternative’ in our title is to be understood broadly. The contributors are not just looking at the self-proclaimed alternatives (hippies, New Agers, back-to-nature types, etc.) but at labour migrants from outside Western Europe and affluent resettlers as well. Members of all these groups are, in their own way, contributing towards the construction of a non-traditional countryside. All of them help to maintain life in rural areas which would otherwise be emptying of residents.

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Alternative countrysides

Anthropology and rural West Europe today

Jeremy MacClancy

To set the scene for the rest of the book, this chapter discusses the evolving discourses of the rural and the urban, the exploitation of this discourse by some political parties, and the rise of the heritage industry. It then proceeds to survey the literature, in both anthropology and geography, on north European immigration into rural Western Europe: who these people are, when they arrived, what effects have they had on the social, economic, and political life of the places they chose to settle in. Since this material is relatively scanty, I have also relied on material within popular travelogues. I then discuss, in a similar manner, the nature and consequence of labour migration from North Africa and Eastern Europe to these areas. I conclude by considering the roles anthropologists can play today in today’s countrysides, in the development of rural life and the formulation of rural policy.

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Budd L. Hall, Edward T. Jackson, Rajesh Tandon, Jean-Marc Fontan and Nirmala Lall

Community-university research partnerships can be critically important locations of transformative energy in the larger effort to understand and use knowledge and its construction and co-construction in ways that are authentically linked to the struggles of people for a better world. The global neo-liberal economic agenda that has produced a kind of market utopia has been supported by a canon of western, largely male, elite knowledge systems and practices. The field of community-university research and engagement partnerships represents just one of the elements in an emerging knowledge democracy movement. The longer-term prospects of the world economy pose their own set of challenges to civil society and to knowledge partnerships. As the new economic powers of China, Brazil and other nations continue their ascendance, and as the West struggles to regain its economic equilibrium, universities and communities across the world will face new threats and opportunities in their work together.

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Against the grain?

Socially critical movies

Chris Beasley and Heather Brook

While this book contends that all movies are political, some are more self-consciously political than others. In Part III (chapters 10 and 11), the emphasis is on a spectrum of films centrally engaged in social critique. These films are marked by relatively overt questions regarding social justice and power relations. In this chapter we outline the key characteristics, historical contexts, and typical subject matter of such films in order to clarify the boundaries of what Hollywood constitutes as ‘political’.

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Sarah Cormode

Aboriginal transitions research project was initiated by the University of Victoria, Office of Community-Based Research (OCBR), Office of Indigenous Affairs (INAF) and Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association (IAHLA). The three partners proposed to jointly conduct comprehensive community-based research to investigate the transition of Aboriginal students from Aboriginal-controlled post-secondary education institutes to public post-secondary education institutes. Aboriginal students face a number of barriers to attaining a post-secondary education in Canada. The aboriginal transitions research project has validated the role of Aboriginal-controlled learning institutes and has added to a growing body of theory that discusses Aboriginal student success. The project adopted a community-based participatory research framework and employed several methods, including a literature review, interviews and focus groups for data collection. It has also made an important contribution to the theory and practice of community-based research, generally.

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Steve Chibnall

By the spring of 1953 it was clear that British cinema had found a film-maker who could handle the technical demands of the thriller in a cinematic rather than a purely theatrical fashion. With The Yellow Balloon, Lee Thompson had demonstrated an aptitude for visual storytelling and a flair for imaginative shot composition while coaxing compelling performances from his actors. Late in 1952 he noticed a new book from Victor Gollancz which was causing a stir, reaching its fifth impression within two months of publication. It may be a worn-flat cliché, but this was to be the book that changed Lee Thompson's life. He read the book called Who Lie in Gaol by Joan Henry, and fell in love with her. Lee Thompson quickly set to work with Joan Henry and Anne Burnaby to develop a screenplay which would blend social criticism and melodrama with the leavening ingredient of comedy.