Search results

You are looking at 11 - 15 of 15 items for

  • Author: Richard Hayton x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search

This book analyses the oratorical and rhetorical techniques of twelve leading orators who have affected the evolution of Labour Party politics in the post-war period, and demonstrates the important role of oratory. The twelve leading orators are Aneurin Bevan, Hugh Gaitskell, Tony Benn, Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot, Neil Kinnock, John Smith, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband. The book considers how the politician in question used their oratorical skills in relation to three key audiences: the Parliamentary Party; the wider party membership; and the electorate. These audiences relate to three important oratorical arenas, namely Parliament; party conference; public and media engagement (the electoral arena). The book assesses how political rhetoric has been deployed in an effort to advance competing ideological positions within the party, and the role of oratory in communicating Labour's ideology to a wider audience. It argues that oratory remains a significant feature of Labour politics in Britain, and analyses how it has changed over time and in different contexts. A small (but growing) number of scholars have energised the study of rhetoric in British politics, and brought it more mainstream attention in the discipline. The academic study of the art of oratory has received relatively little attention from scholars interested in British politics.

How do leading Conservative figures strive to communicate with and influence the electorate? Why have some proven more effective than others in advancing their personal positions and ideological agendas? How do they seek to connect with their audience in different settings, such as the party conference, House of Commons, and through the media?

This book draws analytical inspiration from the Aristotelian modes of persuasion to shine new and insightful light upon the articulation of British conservatism, examining the oratory and rhetoric of twelve key figures from Conservative Party politics. The individual orators featured are Stanley Baldwin, Winston Churchill, Harold Macmillan, Iain Macleod, Enoch Powell, Keith Joseph, Margaret Thatcher, Michael Heseltine, John Major, William Hague, Boris Johnson, and David Cameron. Each chapter is written by an expert in the field and explores how its subject attempted to use oratory to advance their agenda within the party and beyond.

This is the first book to analyse Conservative Party politics in this way, and along with its companion volume, Labour Orators from Bevan to Miliband, marks an important new departure in the analysis of British politics. It will be of particular interest to students of Conservative Party politics, conservatism more broadly, British political history, ideologies and party politics, and communication studies.

Abstract only
Analysing oratory in Labour politics
Andrew S. Crines and Richard Hayton

This introduction provides an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book assesses one of the most renowned Labour orators, Aneurin Bevan. It argues that although his fiery oratory and role as standard-bearer for the Bevanites informed his reputation as a divisive agitator, Bevan's powerful rhetoric was primarily anti-Conservative rather than aimed at fermenting intra-party ideological disputes. The book evaluates the man who defeated Bevan in the 1955 leadership election to succeed Clement Attlee as Labour leader, Hugh Gaitskell. It shows how Gaitskell's successor, Harold Wilson, could employ varied forms of oratory to appeal to different audiences and frequently drew on pathos and a romantic style. The book considers the more laid-back communication style of the fourth Labour leader to become prime minister, James Callaghan. It evaluates the oratory of Gordon Brown, who was the dominant figure in New Labour politics.

in Labour orators from Bevan to Miliband
Abstract only
Analysing oratory in Conservative Party politics
Richard Hayton and Andrew S. Crines
in Conservative orators from Baldwin to Cameron
Abstract only
Oratory and rhetoric in Conservative Party politics
Richard Hayton and Andrew S. Crines
in Conservative orators from Baldwin to Cameron