Search results

You are looking at 21 - 23 of 23 items for

  • Author: Tom Gallagher x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Tom Gallagher

This chapter reports the degree to which European Union (EU)-sponsored anti-corruption efforts made any difference to the scale of the chronic problem that dominated public life in Romania from 1989 until after it joined the EU. The EU was acutely concerned to discover the extent of corruption in Romania and the determination of figures high up in the political system to allow it to remain unimpeded. Anti-corruption rhetoric was merely a device to scare off or punish rivals. The anti-corruption legislation obliged public officials to fill out income and asset declarations in the belief that ‘the most serious forms of corruption in Romania are associated with organized crime’. The EU failed to acquire its own methodology for benchmarking corruption, which would have made it easier to commit recalcitrant governments to specific undertakings.

in Romania and the European Union
Tom Gallagher

This chapter explores the first year of Romania's membership inside the European Union (EU). The ruling Liberals and their allies decided to go on the political offensive, which would be directed at the EU and the USA. The European Commission sent a report to the Parliament and the Council of the EU on the justice system. The report was unable to discover much progress in justice reform. The EU did threaten to penalise Romania over economic failings. The EU had never shown much need to strengthen civic forces in Romania so that they might act as a counterweight to a venal political elite. The Partidul Social Democrat (PSD) (Social Democratic Party)'s recovery derived from the strength of provincial barons. The mood of most Romanians would result in a transformation of political standards.

in Romania and the European Union
Abstract only
Tom Gallagher

It is clear that Romania joined with the accession criteria relaxed or even set aside in key areas. The European Union (EU) revealed itself to be an institution that had great difficulty projecting democratic values and indeed ethical forms of capitalism into inhospitable terrain. Political power continued to be wielded by a narrow set of parties and economic interest groups. The shape of the acquis communautaire determined the nature of the EU's engagement with Romania. The EU failed to make a significant impact on the corruption, clientelism and very low standards in public life that characterised Romanian politics. It established a privileged partnership with political forces with a questionable commitment to democracy and an inability not to plunder public funds even in the full gaze of Eurocrats. The mishandling of the Romanian application means that a large, under-developed state now finds itself inside the Union.

in Romania and the European Union