Search results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author: James Dunkerley x
  • Manchester International Relations x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Abstract only
Thinking about America in the world over the longer run
James Dunkerley

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book offers an analytical reconstruction of Carl Schmitt's interpretation of American foreign policy on the backdrop of the apparent paradox in the reception of his legacy in America and Europe. It approaches the peculiar US vocation for nation-building on a global scale from the perspective of domestic experience. The book considers the extraordinary vision of an 'Anglo-world' developed in the last decades of the nineteenth century by the Scots-American magnate Andrew Carnegie. It reviews the initial, often critical reception of Clash of Civilizations and seeks to explain why the text has continued to enjoy such widespread attention. The book provides a politico-intellectual biography of Paul Wolfowitz from 1969 until he took up service in the administration of George W. Bush.

in American foreign policy
Abstract only
Samuel Huntington’s The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order revisited
James Dunkerley

In this chapter, the author hopes to make the case that Samuel Huntington's inconsistency of voice, method and concept has preserved interest in his work through the post-Cold War 'unipolar moment'. The case for revisiting Samuel Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of the World Order can readily be made on those of reviewing the intellectual and policy environment of the immediate post-Cold War years. The confusion of public rhetoric, particularly from the George W. Bush administration in the wake of the attacks, enabled 'Clash of Civilization' to be misattributed disavowed, and misunderstood alike by supporters, agnostics and critics of the Huntingtonian thesis as well as the administration. Huntington's depiction of Islamic 'civilisation' has proved to be the most criticised feature of his argument, and he himself uncharacteristically backed away from claims of prescience.

in American foreign policy
Studies in intellectual history

The middle months of 2016 in the North Atlantic world offered a distinctly depressing constellation. This book offers a nuanced and multifaceted collection of essays covering a wide range of concerns, concepts, presidential doctrines, and rationalities of government thought to have marked America's engagement with the world during this period. The spate of killings of African Americans raised acute issues about the very parameters of citizenship that predated the era of Civil Rights and revived views on race associated with the pre- Civil War republic. The book analyses an account of world politics that gives ontological priority to 'race' and assigns the state a secondary or subordinate function. Andrew Carnegie set out to explain the massive burst in productivity in the United States between 1830 and 1880, and in so doing to demonstrate the intrinsic superiority of republicanism. He called for the abolition of hereditary privilege and a written constitution. The book also offers an exegesis of the US foreign policy narrative nested in the political thought of the German jurist Carl Schmitt. Understanding the nature of this realist exceptionalism properly means rethinking the relationship between realism and liberalism. The book revisits Samuel Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of the World Order, which reviews the intellectual and policy environment of the immediate post- Cold War years. Finally, it discusses Paul Dundes Wolfowitz, best known for his hawkish service to the George W. Bush administration, and his strong push for the invasion and occupation of Iraq.