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The United States in the Asia and Indo-Pacifics
Inderjeet Parmar

make up the vast Asia Pacific region, from the western coasts of the United States and South America to the territories of East and Southeast Asia and Oceania, and then further west to include the Indian Ocean and its main constituent state actors such as India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. It was the more narrowly defined Asia Pacific which quickly became a key foreign policy priority for Obama as he set about trying to escape the imperial quagmires of Iraq and Afghanistan to which so many US resources had been devoted during the post-9/11 era. Obama’s “Pivot” (or

in The United States in the Indo-Pacific
Reuben Wong

9 The European Union’s security strategy in the ASEAN region Reuben Wong The EU has a military dimension as well: our economic face is the one most Asians (and also most Europeans!) are more familiar with. … We are one of the major investors in this continent, both in qualitative and quantitative terms, and the biggest development donor. … But our engagement with Asia goes well beyond trade, investment, and aid. It’s political. It’s strategic(al). And it needs to develop more also in the security field. (Federica Mogherini, High Representative of EU CFSP, VP

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Open Access (free)
Education and development in modern Southeast Asian history
Tim Harper

Bayly 08_Tonra 01 21/06/2011 10:33 Page 193 8 The tools of transition: education and development in modern Southeast Asian history Tim Harper In 1935, one of Java’s greatest educators, Ki Hajar Dewantara (1889–1959), reflected on modern education and its accomplishments: It is not an easy task to go through a period of transition, and it becomes even harder when extraneous factors intervene in the renovation process, greatly hindering a normal adjustment. How often we have been misled by presumed needs which we considered natural but which we later realized

in History, historians and development policy
Abstract only
Sara Upstone

6 Meera Syal To be sure, whoever realises the senselessness, the hopelessness of this world, might well despair, but this despair is not a result of this world. Rather it is an answer given by an individual to this world; another answer would be not to despair, would be an individual’s decision to endure this world in which we live like Gulliver among the giants.1 Near the beginning of Meera Syal’s second novel, Life Isn’t All Ha Ha Hee Hee (1999), one of the three central protagonists, Tania, is making a film about the British Asian experience. Her producer

in British Asian fiction
Abstract only
Sara Upstone

example of a school of British Asian writing which also includes Preethi Nair, Nisha Minhas and B. K. Mahal: a British Asian romance genre intervention. Born in Mumbai in 1961, and coming to Britain at the age of eight, Srivastava’s two novels, Maya, and the earlier Transmission (1992), feature young women protagonists, working in creative industries, with roles as writers and television researchers that mirror Srivastava’s own career path (Srivastava has written screenplays, plays, librettos, and short stories as well as novels). These women are perfect models of the

in British Asian fiction
Julian M. Simpson

150 5 From ‘pairs of hands’ to family doctors The professional options of South Asian doctors who decided to stay in Britain were limited, notably as a result of racism and heterophobia. Discrimination operated both in hospital medicine, resulting in migrant doctors being directed towards general practice, and within general practice itself resulting in outsiders being at a disadvantage when it came to obtaining posts in the more desirable areas. The presence of South Asian doctors in general practice in industrial and inner-​city areas is nevertheless partly

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Abstract only
Sara Upstone

9 Suhayl Saadi We have become bulimic with TV comedy dramas about Asian restaurants, dancers chained forever to their bangles, arranged/multiple marriages and everywhere, as though in some smokey dwam of metaphysical trans-substantiation, the odor of curry – it seems that as soon as the prospect of a brown face appears on the page or the screen, the repertoire, the vision, of commissioning bodies suddenly become terrifyingly limited … Even when the writing is urban realist, about ‘gangstas’ or whatever, usually the writers maintain a sense of linguistic decorum

in British Asian fiction
Obama’s legacy in US China Policy
Peter Gries

Introduction After seven years of a George W. Bush foreign policy focused on the “war on terror”, Barack Obama came into office in 2009 seeking to “pivot” US foreign policy towards a growing Asia. Together with his Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, he was particularly keen to reset a US relationship with China that had withered under a Bush administration engrossed in the Middle East. Working with China, Obama and Clinton hoped, would help resolve a growing list of bilateral, regional and global security challenges. Instead, the eight years of the Obama

in The United States in the Indo-Pacific
Gendered legacies and feminist futures in the Asia-Pacific
Katrina Lee-Koo

T HE VIOLENCE AND vastness of gendered insecurities in the Asia-Pacific remains confronting, and crosses the spectrum of insecurities seen worldwide. While many of these insecurities, like poverty, lack of access to political power or the spread of HIV/AIDS are not specific to gender, or indeed the Asia-Pacific, they do affect different women and men in

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Julian M. Simpson

93 3 The empire of the mind and medical migration It is important, in order to understand how the NHS and British general practice were able to draw on the labour of South Asian doctors, to appreciate, as was shown in the previous chapter, how British immigration and medical registration policies remained defined by imperial legacies for much of this period. It is also crucial to appreciate that these legacies continued to shape medicine in the Indian subcontinent and the thought processes of doctors—​as is apparent in their oral history interviews and in

in Migrant architects of the NHS