Search results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 268 items for :

  • "Samuel Beckett" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Martin Harries

). 9 For a compelling treatment of Beckett and the post-war predicament of action, see Halpern ( 2017 ). 10 For Beckett's cuts to Endgame , see especially his letter of 15 November 1981 to his Polish translator, quoted in Gontarski's introduction to Beckett, The Theatrical Notebooks of Samuel Beckett: Endgame (Beckett, 1992 , xviii). Gontarski's text of the play in that volume

in Beckett and media
Abstract only
Daniela Caselli

persuasion, in Proust Dante becomes a literary monument, whose genius remains undisputed; he is the auctoritas , citable and re-usable. In Dream of Fair to Middling Women Dante will instead become ‘a great game’, ‘a brilliant pastiche’. 57 Notes 1 Samuel Beckett, ‘Dante…Bruno.Vico..Joyce’, in Ruby Cohn (ed.), Disjecta: Miscellaneous Writings and a Dramatic Fragment (New York: Grove Press, 1984), p. 19; subsequent references are given in the text. Ruby Cohn explains that the essay ‘appeared in

in Beckett’s Dantes
Daniela Caselli

, thus the association with Lucia Joyce. In the ‘ Dream ’ notebook Beckett records that Lucia, one of the ‘tre donne benedette’ from Paradiso , comes from Syracuse. James Knowlson, Damned to Fame: The Life of Samuel Beckett (London: Bloomsbury, 1996), p. 151. Toynbee also records her origins. Paget Toynbee, Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1898), p. 343. Details about the blind martyr of Syracuse who allegorically stands for the illuminating grace can also be found in the ‘Dante’ notebooks, TCD

in Beckett’s Dantes
From the literary corpus to the transmedia archive
David Houston Jones

has so far managed to do it. (qtd in Mackay, 2015 : 69) The comment is part of a round table exchange in which Fisher rejects Shane Brighton's notion of a tradition of ‘tragic witnessing’ seen in Beckett and Gerrard. For Brighton, Gerrard's work is situated within ‘a specifically Irish tradition, that of Samuel Beckett. In Beckett we find characters whose tragic experience is radically trapped within particular spaces from which they have no way of moving’ ( 2015 : 46). Fisher

in Beckett’s afterlives
Abstract only
Barry Reay
and
Nina Attwood

European greats drove the French publisher to distraction, and he outlined his grievances in a long letter to Samuel Beckett, referring to ‘all the Olympia authors’ Rosset had ‘pumped away’ from his catalogue, ‘all my great authors vanished one by one, in the manner of a classical Agatha Christie novel, only to pop up on Grove’s list’. 19 Rosset had, according to Girodias, ‘drained Olympia’s backlist to the dregs’. 20 Aury, Beckett, Burroughs, Genet, Sade, Miller, all important Grove authors, were published in English

in Dirty books
Abstract only
Ruvani Ranasinha

Wakelam recalls first meeting Kureishi [‘handsome, funny’] at Lemon's home in the early 1980s. Like Paul Holub, Wakelam conjures the intensity of their bond: ‘We got on, delighted in each other's company, exchanged phone numbers etc. … [soon] we were thick. It felt like a love affair.’) 91 Kureishi sought a publisher for his play-scripts, meeting John Calder on 24 January 1981. The gruff, radical cosmopolitan and independent publisher of Samuel Beckett and Henry Miller, responsible for introducing French writers Robbe

in Hanif Kureishi
Abstract only
Ruvani Ranasinha

Gothard. The energetic, loquacious, fleshy-faced figure with a shock of sandy hair succeeded Gill as director in 1980. Financially supported by Labour-run Hammersmith council, 61 run very professionally, but with flexibility and enormous imagination, the Studios was ahead of its time. It offered a rich array of international artists, especially for a ‘local’ arts centre – Dario Fo, Samuel Beckett, Japan's Suzuki Theatre, Joe Chaikin, Kathy Acker, Sam Shepard, Athol Fugard, the original production of anti-apartheid satire

in Hanif Kureishi
W. J. McCormack

international tension as a metaphor employed of the private life, even if Bowen proceeds to claim that her complex people are ‘unobjective with regard to society; their standards are entirely personal.’ 1 One can point to work by Samuel Beckett, Dennis Johnston, Louis MacNeice, Flann O’Brien and Francis Stuart which, turning at some level upon the reality of the war, marked a

in Dissolute characters
Abstract only
Queer theory, literature and the politics of sameness
Author:

In its contributions to the study of material social differences, queer theoretical writing has mostly assumed that any ideas which embody 'difference' are valuable. More than this, where it is invoked in contemporary theory, queerness is often imagined as synonymous with difference itself. This book uncovers an alternative history in queer cultural representation. Through engagement with works from a range of queer literary genres from across the long twentieth century – fin-de-siècle aestheticism, feminist speculative fiction, lesbian middle-brow writing, and the tradition of the stud file – the book elucidates a number of formal and thematic attachments to ideas that have been denigrated in queer theory for their embodiment of sameness: uselessness, normativity, reproduction and reductionism. Exploring attachments to these ideas in queer culture is also the occasion for a broader theoretical intervention: Same Old suggests, counterintuitively, that the aversion they inspire may be of a piece with how homosexuality has been denigrated in the modern West as a misguided orientation towards sameness. Combining queer cultural and literary history, sensitive close readings and detailed genealogies of theoretical concepts, Same Old encourages a fundamental rethinking of some of the defining positions in queer thought.

Abstract only
Amanda Wrigley
and
John Wyver

been productive engagements with the cross-overs of theatre and television in discussions of Samuel Beckett’s works (Herren 2007 , in addition to Bignell 2012 ). But the numerous small-screen presentations of notable stagings by, among many others, the Birmingham Repertory Company, the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), about which Wyver has written ( 2019 ), and the National Youth Theatre as well as more recently by Talawa Theatre, the Royal Court and

in Screen plays