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Gordon T. Stewart

their economic, political and verbal jousts with their fellow-Britons in Dundee? The ‘romance’ of the title may simply reflect the sentimentality often associated with the expatriate experience. Wallace, like many leading figures in Calcutta jute, was fond of Scottish verse, perhaps inspired by the whisky-filled celebrations of Robert Burns’s birthday which was faithfully marked every January in

in Jute and empire
John Wolffe

This article explores evangelical perceptions of the Reformation, with particular reference to the commemoration in 1835 of the tercentenary of the publication of Coverdales English Bible. The first half of the nineteenth century saw a growth in evangelical interest in the Reformation, although historical understanding of the sixteenth century was initially unsophisticated and simplistic equations between past and present were widespread. The 1835 commemoration exposed a tendency to use history as a tool in contemporary controversies between Anglicans and Protestants Dissenters, as well as in the polemics of both against Roman Catholics. It also, however, helped to stimulate the growth of serious scholarly inquiry and publication about the Reformation, notably in the formation (1840) of the Parker Society. The commemorations of the tercentenaries of the accession of Elizabeth I (1858) and of the Scottish Reformation (1860) provide concluding vantage points from which to view the development of historical understanding of the Reformation during the preceding quarter century.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Julian Goodare and Martha McGill

Upon a tyme the faierie elves Having first array’d themselves They thought it fit to cloath their king In robs fit for revelling He had a cobweb shirt more fin[e]‌ Then ever spider yet did spin Bleach’d in the whytening of the snow When the northern winds did blow. This quotation is from a poem that circulated in seventeenth-century England and Scotland. In sixty-four lines, the poem describes the elaborate outfits donned by the fairy king and queen in preparation for a ‘revel’. 1 Humorous in tone, it explores the fairies’ fantastical

in The supernatural in early modern Scotland

The relationship between Scotland and the British Empire in the twentieth century was wide-ranging. This book represents ground-breaking research in the field of Scotland's complex and often-changing relationship with the British Empire in the period. The contours of Scottish intercontinental migration were significantly redrawn during the twentieth century as a consequence of two world wars. The book reveals the apparent means used to assess the complexities of linking places of birth to migration and to various modern attempts to appeal to ethnic diasporas. The strange case of jute brings out some paradoxical dimensions to Scotland's relationship with England and the empire in the twentieth century. The book argues that the Scottish immigrants' perceptions of class, race and gender were equally important for interpreting the range of their experiences in the British Columbia. The mainstay of organised anti-colonialist critique and mobilisation, in Scotland lay in socialist and social democratic groups. The book examines how the Scottish infantry regiments, and their popular and political constituencies, responded to rapidly reducing circumstances in the era of decolonisation. Newspapers such as The Scotsman, The Glasgow Herald, and the Daily Record brought Africa to the Scottish public with their coverage of Mau Mau insurgency and the Suez Crisis. The book looks into the Scottish cultural and political revival by examining the contributions of David Livingstone. It also discusses the period of the Hamilton by-election of 1967 and the three referenda of 1979, 1997 and 2014 on devolution and independence.

Author: Angela McCarthy

Recent studies of the Irish and the Scots in New Zealand have pointed to the prevalence of social networks for migrants. This book argues that discrimination, even when experienced, was not a precondition for the ethnic consciousness felt by and ascribed to the Irish and Scots in New Zealand. Rather, most aspects of their ethnic identities were positively constructed and articulated. It contends that overarching narratives of exile had little significance in the development of Irish and Scottish ethnic identities in New Zealand. The book looks at the ways in which Irish and Scottish migrants and their sense of Irishness and Scottishness been examined in studies of the diaspora. A sense of being Irish or Scottish is explored, along with identifications such as Highlander, Lowlander, Northern Irish, and Southern Irish, Britishness; New Zealand identities are also considered. The book highlights the range of sources from which we can obtain some insight into the use of and attitudes towards the Irish and Scottish languages and accents in New Zealand. A range of elements including music, festivals, food and drink, and dress is considered to examine the material tokens of Irish and Scottish ethnicity. Religious and political identities were also important aspects of Scottishness and Irishness. A range of national characteristics is examined among the migrants and their descendants in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Views of New Zealand and its indigenous Maori population are further ways in which Irish and Scottish migrants conveyed aspects of their identities.

This book is wholly devoted to assessing the array of links between Scotland and the Caribbean in the later eighteenth century. It uses a wide range of archival sources to paint a detailed picture of the lives of thousands of Scots who sought fortunes and opportunities, as Burns wrote, ‘across th' Atlantic roar’. The book outlines the range of their occupations as planters, merchants, slave owners, doctors, overseers and politicians, and shows how Caribbean connections affected Scottish society during the period of ‘improvement’. The book highlights the Scots' reinvention of the system of clanship to structure their social relations in the empire and finds that involvement in the Caribbean also bound Scots and English together in a shared Atlantic imperial enterprise and played a key role in the emergence of the British nation and the Atlantic world.

John Milton on the failure of the Ulster plantation
Nicholas McDowell

Confederate Association, made up of Gaelic Irish and ‘Old English’ settlers, and Charles I’s lord lieutenant in Ireland, James Butler, Marquis of Ormond (1610–88). Ormond’s army was joined in the opening months of 1649 by Cavaliers fleeing England after defeat in the second civil war and the execution of Charles I on 30 January. A further ‘complication’ was the horror of the mainly Scottish Presbyterian settlers in Ulster at the regicide and their antagonism to an English republican regime dominated by Independents, generally more tolerant of sectarianism and opposed to a

in The plantation of Ulster
John M. MacKenzie and Nigel R. Dalziel

that emerged from the Scottish Enlightenment as well as from an energetic evangelicalism. Both Somerset and his successor but one, Sir Lowry Cole, explicitly saw much of this activity as essentially ‘anti-English’. The Scots, of course, did not conduct these battles alone. At different times, and for differing purposes, they were involved in shifting alliances with the elite Cape Dutch as well as other

in The Scots in South Africa
Abstract only
‘We Want “U” In’
Janet McBain

This short essay draws on research undertaken by the curator of the Scottish Screen Archive on the few surviving films credited to Greens Film Service of Glasgow in the teens and twenties. The research revealed a dynamic family business, born out of the travelling cinematograph shows of the late nineteenth century, growing to assume a dominant role in the Scottish cinema trade in the silent era, across exhibition, distribution and production. One small part of a lost film history waiting for rediscovery – early cinema in Scotland.

Film Studies
and the Triumph of Scottish Schadenfreude
Chris Murray

This article examines Denise Mina‘s treatment of Scottish identity and the gothic tradition in her run on Hellblazer, an American horror comic about an English occultist, John Constantine. Mina takes Constantine to Glasgow to confront the deadly “empathy plague” which forces victims to emphasise with others. Mina argues that the Scots revel in the misery of others, making them easy victims for this malady. However, this failing becomes a means for victory, as everyone is united in an outpouring of shameful joy at the story‘s conclusion. Mina‘s Scotland is a home away from home for Constantine – haunted, embittered and lost – and her image of Scotland mirrors representations seen in other Scottish Gothic texts.

Gothic Studies