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Peter Hutchings

number of historically specific variants or interpretations arranged around an originating literary text or cultural myth, but rather as part of a chain of interpretations which runs through particular social and historical contexts. Clearly this works against any notion of an unbroken continuity that links either literary gothic or a more diffuse gothic sensibility directly to British horror cinema. (While Hammer’s filmmakers might on occasion rescue elements which had been lost in earlier stage and film

in Hammer and beyond
Ruth Barton

Josie traversing the lonely bogscape near a little-used narrow-gauge railway of the kind employed by Bord na Móna (the Irish Turf Development Board) to transport fuel. Only at the very end of the film does Abrahamson provide the shot of a still, early morning river, which one might expect of a film set in the Irish countryside, but then this moment of pastoralism is ruptured, first with two shots of flies on its surface, and then with the intrusion of death. This is not the Bog Gothic of horror cinema, which is just the kind of representational convention

in Irish cinema in the twenty-first century
Peter Hutchings

films for Hammer, these changes would be manifested more clearly and more self-consciously. The Baron and the Devil David Pirie has observed that British horror cinema had by 1966 ‘lost some of its original rigidity and was beginning to hunt for new talent and new ideas’. 20 In particular, the brilliant young director Michael Reeves was about to introduce both a psychological intensity and an emphasis on

in Terence Fisher
Franju’s cinematic aesthetics
Kate Ince

his film-making: as Vialle puts it, Franju’s films are ‘miroirs de l’insolite, perturbateurs de nos perceptions du réel’ (Vialle 1968 : 176). 22 Jean Cocteau observed of Les Yeux sans visage that Franju had not forgotten the important rule in horror cinema about treating the unreal with the maximum of realism (175), while Jean-Luc Godard’s response to La Tête contre les murs was a more enthusiastic and nuanced discovery of the same

in Georges Franju
Gender, the family and eroticism
Kate Ince

it made its 1963 protest (57). Fetishism of costume is pronounced in Judex , and a certain fetishism of more contemporary clothing comes through in the young people’s leathers in La Tête contre les murs , and in the shiny black rainwear worn by Louisa/Alida Valli in Les Yeux sans visage . (Probably because of other roles she took in Italian and horror cinema that led to her being known just as ‘Valli’, perversity was an

in Georges Franju
Martine Beugnet

privileges the visual and the rhythmic (that is, the way the images are edited together but also the structure of the soundtrack, ambient or musical) over scripted dialogue and plot. Trouble Every Day is probably the most daring in its choice of subject and its play on the tradition of horror cinema. This renewed formal quest and the favouring of taboo topics set her work apart from the documentary and MTV-inspired cinéma de

in Claire Denis
Michael Goodrum and Philip Smith

: Lexington Books, 2001), 112. 16 Kaja Silverman, Male Subjectivity at the Margins (London: Routledge, 1992), 69. 17 Jonathan Rigby, American Gothic: Sixty Years of Horror Cinema (London: Reynolds and Hearn, 2007), 294 18 Stefan Dziemianowicz, ‘Contemporary Horror Fiction 1950–1998’, in Neil Barron (ed.), Fantasy and Horror (Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 1999), 199–244 (200–1). 19 Beatrice M. Murphy, ‘Horror Fiction from the Decline of Universal Horror to the Rise of the Psycho Killer’, in Reyes (ed.), Horror: A Literary History, 131– 158. 20 Roger Sabin, Adult Comics: An

in Printing terror
Michael Goodrum and Philip Smith

:24 82 Printing terror The process of ‘rephallusization’ in media involved shifting representations of the female body, particularly through film. Horror, certainly, played a role in this regard; Raymond Durgnat argues, ‘[t]he only films whose erotic content is as open as that of musicals are horror films’.22 The content of horror comics was informed and emboldened not only by horror cinema but the increasing acceptance of a genre that outdid even the musical in its overt eroticism. Pornography was hardly a new phenomenon and the pin-up, as discussed in more detail

in Printing terror
Michael Goodrum and Philip Smith

solution to another. This meant a remediation of past narratives, imagery, and techniques, within an increasingly complex matrix of unrest, industrially and contextually. The continuing strictures of the Code, even after revision, meant that horror comics could not compete with the innovations in horror cinema by directors such as George Romero (Night of the Living Dead, 1968), Wes Craven (The Last House on the Left, 1972), and Tobe Hooper (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974). Similarly, films such as Rosemary’s Baby (1968) documented fears of and about GOODRUM

in Printing terror
Sarah Wright

3 Memory and the child witness in ‘art-house horror’ ‘Cinema can lay claim to the child, as the child lays claim to cinema’, writes Vicky Lebeau, citing the sequence where Ana (Ana Torrent) and her sister Isabel (Isabel Tellería), two girls living in the post-war Spain of the 1940s, watch James Whale’s Frankenstein (1931) in a makeshift cinema in Víctor Erice’s El espíritu de la colmena: ‘the sequence yields one of the most compelling images of children’s look at the screen, or the look of the child caught up in the wonders, and horrors of the moving image

in The child in Spanish cinema