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Peasant solidarity as horizontal networking?
Paul Routledge and Andrew Cumbers

5217P GLOBAL JUSTICE-PT/lb.qxd 1111 2 3 4 5111 6 7 8 9 10111 11 12 3111 4 5 6 7 8 9 20111 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30111 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 42111 13/1/09 19:59 Page 103 5 People’s Global Action (Asia): peasant solidarity as horizontal networking? People’s Global Action (PGA) represents a network for communication and coordination between diverse place-based (but not place-restricted) social movements, whose membership cuts across differences in gender, ethnicity, language, nationality, age, class and caste. The PGA network owes its genesis to an international

in Global justice networks
Donald F. Lach and Theodore Nicholas Foss

as backdrops for their compositions and to decorate their fictitious characters and imaginary places with mysterious, enchanting or comical names of Asian origin. To writers of fiction, the travel books offered between two covers ideas and sources on many peoples and places. The literary man could travel from Calicut, to Peru, to Zipangu without leaving his chair. The first of the great travel

in Asia in Western fiction
Echoes of Orissa, 1800–2000
Author: Biswamoy Pati

This book aims to sketch the diversities of south Asian social History, focusing on Orissa. It highlights the problems of colonialism and the way it impacted the lives of the colonised, even as it weaves in the manner in which the internal order of exploitation worked. Based on archival and rare, hitherto untapped sources, including oral evidence, it brings to life diverse aspects of Orissa's social history. These include areas like the environment; health and medicine; conversion (in Hinduism); popular movements; social history of some princely states; and the intricate connections between the marginal social groups and Indian nationalism. It also focuses on decolonisation and its meanings. Alongside, it explores the face of patriarchy and gender-related violence in post-colonial Orissa. While achieving this task, this book follows the track of an inter-disciplinary tradition and draws upon social anthropology and political sociology. The manner in which it engages with and questions the received wisdom of imperialist, nationalist and subaltern historiography would make it attractive to both the specialist and the non-specialist reader. Besides focusing on the history of colonialism and its ruthless progress over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, its concerns include the manner in which the post-colonial ruling classes in decolonised south Asia negotiated a host of problems that were allowed to remain and left unresolved. This book would be of interest to students of history, social anthropology, political sociology and cultural studies. It would also attract those associated with non-governmental organisations and planners of public policy.

This book addresses some of the neglected problems, people and vulnerabilities of the Asia-Pacific region. It talks about emancipation, human security, 'security politics', language and threat-construction. The book is divided into three sections: agents; strategies and contexts; and futures. The first section outlines a range of possible agents or actors potentially capable of redressing individual suffering and vulnerability in the region. It examines East Asian regional institutions and dynamics of regionalism as potential sources of 'progressive' security discourses and practices. There is focus on the progressive security potential of regional institutions and regionalism has become increasingly prominent in literature on security in the Asia-Pacific. Two common interpretations of the role of epistemic communities in the construction of security are contested: that they are either passive sources of governmental legitimacy, or autonomous agents with the capacity of constructing or creating state interests. The second section reviews strategies and contexts, outlining a range of different sites of insecurity in the region, the ways in which dominant security discourses and practices emerge, and the extent to which such discourses are contested in different contexts. Indonesian government's approach to minority groups and separatism, the issue of civil unrest and human rights abuses in Burma, and the Australian government's attitude towards refugees and asylum-seekers are discussed. The third section deals with security futures, specifically discussing the question of what alternative security discourses and practices might look like. Finally, the book outlines a feminist critical security discourse and examines its applicability to the Asia-Pacific region.

Part of the new “Great Game”
Harsh V. Pant

11 India in Africa and Central Asia: part of the new “Great Game” India’s links with Africa are centuries old, bolstered by trade across the Indian Ocean and a million-strong diaspora across Africa. Shared colonial legacy and post-independence development experience has framed India’s relationship with Africa. India’s role as a champion of anti-colonialism and anti-racism after its independence in 1947 drew it closer to the African nations. India emerged as one of the most vocal critics of Apartheid in South Africa. New Delhi under its first prime minister

in Indian foreign policy
“Acting” East with an eye on China
Harsh V. Pant

10 India in East and Southeast Asia: “acting” East with an eye on China While the world has been focusing on China’s growing assertiveness in the South China Sea, Beijing and New Delhi are also engaged in a quiet struggle in the contested waters. By putting up for international bidding the same oil block that India had obtained from Vietnam for exploration, China has thrown down a gauntlet.1 By deciding to stay put in the assigned block, India has indicated that it is ready to take up the Chinese challenge. At stake is Chinese opposition to India’s claim to be

in Indian foreign policy
Julie Gilson

T HE SHORT TITLE to this chapter conceals the host of complex geographical, historical, definitional and ideational factors inherent in any attempt to understand what is meant either by ‘security’ in a given region, or the very definition of ‘East Asia’ itself in this particular case. East Asia is not a legally definable entity; it is not bound

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific
Jaewoo Choo

2504Chap6 7/4/03 12:40 pm Page 105 6 The geopolitics of Central Asian energy Jaewoo Choo This chapter assesses the rising geostrategic and geoeconomic importance of Central Asian oil and natural gas for China and the United States – the most transparent source of Sino-American conflict in this region. The initial rationale for Chinese engagement in Central Asia, despite the emergence of China as a net oil-importing nation in 1993, was not driven by the search for an alternative and secure source of oil and natural gas.1 Rather, Chinese policy reflected a

in Limiting institutions?
Strategic reflections
Michael Reiterer

1 The European Union in the Asia-Pacific: strategic reflections Michael Reiterer Introduction Although the EU maintains four (China, Japan, Republic of Korea, India) out of its ten strategic partnerships with Asian partners (Reiterer, 2013a) and is contemplating adding a fifth (with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN), doubts are harboured in Asia whether the EU can be a genuine strategic partner. Perceptions may not match: the EU has over the years developed policy papers dealing with Asia in general (Europe and Asia: A Strategic Framework for

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Political differences yield to economic rivalry
James W. Peterson

Introduction Both Russia and America have made a purposeful and decided effort to direct foreign policy efforts towards Asia, and partly this is related to the growing economies and existing markets in that part of the world. For both nations, an emphasis on Asia would be a kind of welcome relief from the heavy commitments and preoccupations in the West. The United States fought two difficult wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and their denouement offers an opportunity to set new foreign policy priorities. In addition, the Arab Spring presented a

in Russian-American relations in the post-Cold War world