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Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

benefits makes them an excellent research communication opportunity. Note 1 It is worth noting that there has been much critical discussion of media depictions of researchers, particularly related to gender and ethnicity (see, for example, Kitzinger et al. , 2008 ). Further reading Bowater, L., and Yeoman, K., Science Communication: A Practical Guide for Scientists (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013). British Science Association/Science Made Simple, ‘Advice for Presenters’. Retrieved 03 December 2014 at: www.britishscienceassociation.org/british

in Creative research communication
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Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

suggestions on how to write a guide to your argument in your opening paragraphs). 4. Data interpretation and analysis Some essay questions will ask you to interrogate data, or to evaluate claims that are based on data, no matter what form the data take. You could be asked, for example, to: ‘Select three questions from the 2015 British Social Attitudes Survey, describe the results and interpret the findings in light of relevant academic research.’ While this book is not about analysing data, there are some common features to data interpretation and analysis

in The craft of writing in sociology
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Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

British society. The student uses a direct quotation along with summaries in his own words based on the notes he has made on the scholarly literature. Whilst it is clear that friendship is an increasingly important relationship in many people’s lives, the adage ‘you can choose your friends but not your family’ may not be entirely true. Allan (1996: 100) argues that ‘friendships are not freely chosen. They are developed and sustained in the wider framework of people’s lives,’ referring to social factors such as location, workplace and even ethnicity

in The craft of writing in sociology
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Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

have led to opportunities for presenting TV programmes aimed at all sorts of age groups, including slots on Blue Peter a popular British children’s TV programme. Perhaps unsurprisingly, then, Brendan says there are lots of ways that his research can show impact, from commercial through to public engagement. But behind it all sits the research, and that is important. The impact of Brendan’s work has a path back to the participants wired up to the latest adventure ride, or the infant sampling fruit on the look-out for the most tantalising taste. It follows a

in Creative research communication