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Death, decay, and the Technological reliquaries, 1637–67
Erika Doss

pierced by metal pins or wires and perforated by plastic tubes and others studded with beads, hair, mirrors, and plastic insects (flies and butterflies). Thek’s first venture in this aesthetic direction, the meat-themed sculpture La corazza di Michelangelo , was made during the summer of 1963 in Sicily, where he had been invited to stay at the villa of Topazia Alliata

in Republics and empires
John Kinsella

A POLYSITUATED ODE WITH OCCASIONAL, DEMI-BOUSTROPHEDON ‘Odeshock’ Walter Murdoch We’re all in it together, this place, that one too: passing through, born here, born there, overlays and more: tangential butterfly effect out of the flailed hedge, the Romanware they lift from the development site to validate the new-build, historically contextualised, coprolite – dinosaur shit. I am never in once place when I am here. A composite. Hup two hup two hup two three four, the beat tattooed on walkways and paths, squaddies behind the copse, the burgeoning coppiced growth

in Polysituatedness
Entomology, botany and the early ethnographic monograph in the work of H.-A. Junod
Patrick Harries

lepidoptera purely as an expression and proof of God’s glory. Through purchase and exchange, Robert assembled a magnificent collection of 23,000 butterfly species from all over the world. But while Robert was only interested in the remarkable beauty and diversity of these insects, a collector such as Frédéric de Rougemont’s son Frédéric (a pastor in the Independent Church) sought to discern the laws behind

in Science and society in southern Africa
Author: Karen Fricker

This book explores the development of Robert Lepage’s distinctive approach to stage direction in the early (1984–94) and middle (1995–2008) stages of his career, arguing that globalisation had a defining effect in shaping his aesthetic and professional trajectory. It combines examination of Lepage’s theatremaking techniques with discussion of his work’s effects on audiences, calling on Lepage’s own statements as well as existing scholarship and critical response. In addition to globalisation theory, the book draws on cinema studies, queer theory, and theories of affect and reception. As such, it offers an unprecedented conceptual framework, drawing together what has previously been a scattered field of research. Each of six chapters treats a particular aspect of globalisation, using this as a means to explore one or more of Lepage’s productions. These aspects include the relationship of the local (in Lepage’s case, his background in Québec) to the global; the place of individual experience within global late modernity; the effects of screen media on human perception; the particular affect of ‘feeling global’; the place of branding in contemporary creative systems; and the relationship of creative industries to neoliberal economies. Making theatre global: Robert Lepage’s original stage productions will be of interest to scholars of contemporary theatre, advanced-level undergraduates with an interest in the application of theoretical approaches to theatrical creation and reception, and arts lovers keen for new perspectives on one of the most talked-about theatre artists of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Protection of animals in nineteenth-century Britain
Author: Diana Donald

This book explores for the first time women’s leading roles in animal protection in nineteenth-century Britain. Victorian women founded pioneering bodies such as the Battersea Dogs’ Home, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, and the first anti-vivisection society. They intervened directly to stop abuses, promoted animal welfare, and schooled the young in humane values via the Band of Mercy movement. They also published literature that, through strongly argued polemic or through imaginative storytelling, notably in Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty, showed man’s unjustifiable cruelty to animals. In all these enterprises, they encountered opponents who sought to discredit and thwart their efforts by invoking age-old notions of female ‘sentimentality’ or ‘hysteria’, which supposedly needed to be checked by ‘masculine’ pragmatism, rationality and broadmindedness, especially where men’s field sports were concerned. To counter any public perception of extremism, conservative bodies such as the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals for long excluded women from executive roles, despite their crucial importance as donors and grassroots activists. However, women’s growing opportunities for public work in philanthropic projects and the development of militant feminism, running in parallel with campaigns for the vote, gave them greater boldness in expressing their distinctive view of animal–human relations, in defiance of patriarchy. In analysing all these historic factors, the book unites feminist perspectives, especially constructions of gender, with the fast-developing field of animal–human history.

Art, process, archaeology

This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies including prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a New Materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections: ‘Emergent images’, which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as process’, which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and ‘Unfolding images’, which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognise the dynamic and changeable character of images.

Der Blaue Reiter and its legacies
Author: Dorothy Price

This book presents new research on the histories and legacies of the German Expressionist group, Der Blaue Reiter, the founding force behind modernist abstraction. For the first time Der Blaue Reiter is subjected to a variety of novel inter-disciplinary perspectives, ranging from a philosophical enquiry into its language and visual perception, to analyses of its gender dynamics, its reception at different historical junctures throughout the twentieth century, and its legacies for post-colonial aesthetic practices. The volume offers a new perspective on familiar aspects of Expressionism and abstraction, taking seriously the inheritance of modernism for the twenty-first century in ways that will help to recalibrate the field of Expressionist studies for future scholarship. Der Blaue Reiter still matters, the contributors argue, because the legacies of abstraction are still being debated by artists, writers, philosophers and cultural theorists today.

Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

The inflection of desire in Yvonne Vera and Tsitsi Dangarembga
Elleke Boehmer

BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 172 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job 10 Tropes of yearning and dissent: the inflection of desire in Yvonne Vera and Tsitsi Dangarembga1 To build something new, you must be prepared to destroy the past. (Yvonne Vera, Butterfly Burning)2 This chapter seeks to bring into juxtaposition two Zimbabwean women writers and a question of same-sex sexuality: its configurations of desire, its vocabularies of aspiration. It thus extends this book’s overall concern with women’s representation into the area of women

in Stories of women
Mike Buckle and John Thompson

.5 . (ii)   Butterfly spread. A butterfly strategy is also similar to a straddle, examined earlier in this section, and has the same underlying rationale of trading against movements in the volatility of exchange rates. In this strategy, however, a floor is provided for the maximum loss or a ceiling to the maximum gain. Purchase of a butterfly (a long butterfly) entails buying an

in The UK financial system (fifth edition)