Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 1,395 items for :

  • "Caribbean" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Daniel Owen Spence

Part I The Caribbean

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
Author: Philip Nanton

The book argues that the frontier, usually associated with the era of colonial conquest, has great, continuing and under explored relevance to the Caribbean region. Identifying the frontier as a moral, ideational and physical boundary between what is imagined as civilization and wilderness, the book seeks to extend frontier analysis by focusing on the Eastern Caribbean multi island state of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The continuing relevance of the concept of frontier, and allied notions of civilization and wilderness, are illuminated through an analysis of the ways in which SVG is perceived and experienced by both outsiders to the society and its insiders. Using literary sources, biographies and autobiography, the book shows how St. Vincent is imagined and made sense of as a modern frontier; a society in the balance between an imposed civilized order and an untameable wild that always encroaches, whether in the form of social dislocation, the urban presence of the ‘Wilderness people’ or illegal marijuana farming in the northern St. Vincent hills. The frontier as examined here has historically been and remains very much a global production. Simultaneously, it is argued that contemporary processes of globalization shape the development of tourism and finance sectors, as well as patterns of migration, they connect to shifting conceptions of the civilized and the wild, and have implications for the role of the state and politics in frontier societies.

Ryan Hanley

Cato Street and the Caribbean 81 5 Cato Street and the Caribbean Ryan Hanley The historiography of protest and radicalism in early nineteenth-century Britain sometimes seems most clearly divided on questions of geography. On the one hand, a long-standing tradition emphasises the significance of internal, often localised motivating and organisational factors in the sudden outbreaks of violent resistance that seem to characterise the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century political topography of the British Isles.1 Most modern working-class and labour

in The Cato Street Conspiracy
Howard Johnson

The transition from slavery to freedom in the British Caribbean raised, for the colonial economic and political elite, the question of exercising control over the free labour force. The challenge of emancipation for the former slaveholding class was to retain dominance over the ex-slaves without the extensive coercive powers which slavery had allowed

in Policing the empire
Heather Cateau

5 Re-examining the labour matrix in the British Caribbean 1750 to 1850 Heather Cateau The two major labour systems which dominated the British Caribbean between the middle of the eighteenth century and the middle of the nineteenth century were the systems of West African enslavement and Indian indentureship. These were the most dominant modes of securing labour, but playing a secondary role during this period were also systems which involved the use of paid labour to varying degrees. This period was also characterised by the use of the hiring system, metayage

in Emancipation and the remaking of the British imperial world
Experts and the development of the British Caribbean, 1940–62
Author: Sabine Clarke

This book produces a major rethinking of the history of development after 1940 through an exploration of Britain’s ambitions for industrialisation in its Caribbean colonies. Industrial development is a neglected topic in histories of the British Colonial Empire, and we know very little of plans for Britain’s Caribbean colonies in general in the late colonial period, despite the role played by riots in the region in prompting an increase in development spending. This account shows the importance of knowledge and expertise in the promotion of a model of Caribbean development that is best described as liberal rather than state-centred and authoritarian. It explores how the post-war period saw an attempt by the Colonial Office to revive Caribbean economies by transforming cane sugar from a low-value foodstuff into a lucrative starting compound for making fuels, plastics and medical products. In addition, it shows that as Caribbean territories moved towards independence and America sought to shape the future of the region, scientific and economic advice became a key strategy for the maintenance of British control of the West Indian colonies. Britain needed to counter attempts by American-backed experts to promote a very different approach to industrial development after 1945 informed by the priorities of US foreign policy.

Abstract only
Colonial Structures and the Gothic Genre in Contemporary Puerto Rican Narrative
Sandra M. Casanova-Vizcaíno

This article analyses the representation of several colonial structures in the Caribbean reconfiguration of the Gothic genre, specifically in two works of contemporary Puerto Ricanfiction: Miss Florences Trunk: Fragments for a Romantic Trash Novel (1991) by Ana Lydia Vega and Over My Dead Body (2012) by Marta Aponte Alsina. In these novellas, specifically through the main characters reading of diaries and confessions, we are presented with a description of the physical structures. At the same time, the colonial structure also emerges, a context in which slavery, sexual abuse and mulataje are described as ubiquitous sources of terror.

Gothic Studies

Slavery and the slavery business have cast a long shadow over British history. In 1833, abolition was heralded as evidence of Britain's claim to be themodern global power, its commitment to representative government in Britain, free labour, the rule of law, and a benevolent imperial mission all aspects of a national identity rooted in notions of freedom and liberty. Yet much is still unknown about the significance of the slavery, slave-ownership and emancipation in the formation of modern imperial Britain. This essays in this book explore fundamental issues including the economic impact of slavery and slave-ownership, the varied forms of labour deployed in the imperial world, including hired slaves and indentured labourers, the development of the C19th imperial state, slavery and public and family history, and contemporary debates about reparations. The contributors, drawn from Britain, the Caribbean and Mauritius, include some of the most distinguished writers in the field: Clare Anderson, Robin Blackburn, Heather Cateau, Mary Chamberlain, Chris Evans, Pat Hudson, Richard Huzzey, Zoë Laidlaw, Alison Light, Anita Rupprecht, Verene A. Shepherd, Andrea Stuart and Vijaya Teelock. The impact of slavery and slave-ownership is once again becoming a major area of historical and contemporary concern: this book makes a vital contribution to the subject.

1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

Hélène Tremblay were also regularly sent to schools, especially her two substantial volumes on Families of the World ( Tremblay, 1988 , 1990 ), published in English and in French. Sponsored mainly by CIDA, with the support of Save the Children Fund Canada, UNICEF and other United Nations agencies, the volumes were accompanied by ‘Activity Sheets’ as well as ‘Introductions for the Resource Person’, produced by Media-Sphere. A series of posters produced by Media-Sphere, such as two-sided large bilingual glossy sheets entitled ‘Eastern Caribbean’ ( CIDA, 1990b ) and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

’s fifteen local offices in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and South America, there is now a person responsible for communications. Similarly, over the past year, the CRC has created a unique program of training for ‘digital volunteer specialists’ across the organization. Falconer attributes the size and the originality of the program to established strengths of the organization: a network of volunteers who donate according to their individual experience and availability ( Glassford, 2018 ), as well as what she calls the ‘scalable’ nature of an organization

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs