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Hayyim Rothman

familial mutuality he anticipated could only be achieved through the mutual task of creatively sustaining human life. Three, spiritual development; because Hofshi believed — like other religious anarcho-pacifists considered here — that the revolution of the heart is the foundation of world-revolution, cultivating the former becomes an imperative. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a commitment to applying the same ideals to others; if, he says, ‘our external relations are not founded on the same principles as our life within the settlement, nothing new, or nothing

in No masters but God
Cara Delay

that the result was a ‘cultural cataclysm’, in which patterns not only of behaviour but also of thought were transformed. Gone, she argues, were the ‘imagination, memory, creativity and communication’ of the vernacular system, and in their place came ‘linear and colonial thought-patterns’.68 These transformations were also gendered: Bourke, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, and others have interpreted the modern, literate world’s overtaking of ‘creative’ oral traditions as a victory of the masculine over the feminine, the triumph of the male-led ‘devotional revolution’ over the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Carmen Mangion

speech to be positive and creative. With the lessening of structures, our speech tends at times to unconstructive criticism, to lack of discretion, and to emotional out-pourings. No one wants to go back to the rigid structure; some think that more defined norms would help, many are trying to take as their principle Consideration for Others which would include control and quietness of word and action. 63 One sister acknowledged the difficulty of the transition: [W]hen the lid came off, you know, and people began to share and exchange it was very … People, well

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

institutes (national and international) have also banded together on large multi-congregational international projects such as the Arise Foundation that combats modern slavery. 90 Collaborative initiatives have a greater impact and presence and utilise the expertise of a larger group of sisters. In examining the vitality of a select group of religious institutes, theologians noted a ‘strong sense of resilience as their most significant and enduring form of vitality’. In this, sisters model to the Church and to wider society ‘ways of living diminishment creatively and

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Hayyim Rothman

community, he claimed to see ‘the means to destroy the present order and build a new society (Zalkind 1922g ).’ Thus, he wrote: As the individual understands the present social order, he must free himself and his creative powers from their institutions. It is not necessary to wait until the whole proletariat is free. The individual strives to free himself from slavery through his own production. As soon as he is able, he links up with like-minded people and, in this manner, begins an anarcho

in No masters but God
Hayyim Rothman

. Appealing to Schelling's Philosophy of Art , Alexandrov wrote that ‘beauty is the union of the infinity of spirit and the finitude of matter (Schelling 1989 , 85).’ The one who relates to the world from the standpoint of Azilut , uniting finite and infinite in the Absolute, ‘becomes the partner of God in the work of creation.’ Exercising ‘absolute freedom’ of will in creatively dictating the law, he or she defines the contours of divine will and in this sense makes God . Drawing on a zoharic teaching usually understood as a reference to the theurgic power of the

in No masters but God
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

enquiries. 26 Wyclif is closer to the truth here. The Greek etymology is ’ állos (other) combined with ’ agoreúein (to speak). 27 Wyclif fails to identify a sixth way in which allegory works, and this concluding remark hardly qualifies as a plausible candidate. 28 Trópos is strictly ‘direction’, ‘route’ or ‘manner’, but Wyclif offers a creative interpretation of the word here. 29 This is almost right: the second part of anagogy derives from the verb ágein , ‘to

in John Wyclif