Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 3,527 items for :

  • "Economics" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Linda Davies and Gemma Shields

Health Economics Linda Davies and Gemma Shields Chapter overview Evidence is needed to inform and guide the choices that healthcare organisations make in relation to how budgets are spent. The associated costs and benefits of health treatments are key components of such decisions. An economic evaluation is a way of systematically identifying the costs and benefits of different health activities and comparing these to make an informed decision about the best course of action based on the evidence available. Economic evaluations can also be used to identify

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Violence and Miscegenation in Jean Toomer‘s ‘Blood- Burning Moon’
Allan Borst

Jean Toomer‘s Cane (1923) has long been considered a signature text of both avant-garde Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. While Gothic tropes and imagery lurk throughout Toomer‘s collection of poetry and prose, Anglo-American Gothic conventions come to the foreground in the story ‘Blood-Burning Moon’. The story‘s interracial love triangle provides a locus of conflict between the post-Reconstruction American South and the haunting economic logic of slavery. Though the three characters each aspire to new racial, sexual and economic identities, they are terrorized by a society where employer-employee relations cannot escape the violence of the master-slave dialectic. Toomer does not relinquish his aesthetic experimentation and political radicalism to the Anglo-American Gothic, but instead engages the Gothic form in order to critique the violent racism of American capitalism. In this way, Toomer positions the Gothic centrally within African-American literary and cultural history.

Gothic Studies
Open Access (free)
A cognitive perspective
Gilles Allaire

chap 3 13/8/04 4:14 pm Page 61 3 Quality in economics: a cognitive perspective1 Gilles Allaire Introduction The importance of food quality issues in the contemporary global context is well established. Since the early 1990s we have seen developments in nutrition, life sciences and biotech programmes; the setting up of food quality standards in Europe as well as in other OECD countries; the heightened focus of the media on food issues and a series of food safety crises. On the market side these trends have included a reconsideration of business strategy on

in Qualities of food
Pain in Dutch stock trade discourses and practices, 1600–1750
Inger Leemans

11 The economics of pain: pain in Dutch stock trade discourses and practices, 1600–1750 Inger Leemans In 1720, the first international stock exchange crisis hit the financial markets of Paris, London and the Dutch Republic. The ‘mass hysteria’ seems to have fascinated, bewildered and outraged the public. Hundreds of pamphlets, theatre plays and allegories were printed, translated and distributed across the countries involved in the South Sea Bubble, the Mississippi scheme, or wind trade, as the crisis would be referred to in England, France and the Netherlands

in The hurt(ful) body
Abstract only
The perils of leaving economics to the experts

One hundred years ago the idea of ‘the economy’ didn’t exist. Now, improving ‘the economy’ has come to be seen as one of the most important tasks facing modern societies. Politics and policymaking are increasingly conducted in the language of economics and economic logic increasingly frames how political problems are defined and addressed. The result is that crucial societal functions are outsourced to economic experts. The econocracy is about how this particular way of thinking about economies and economics has come to dominate many modern societies and its damaging consequences. We have put experts in charge but those experts are not fit for purpose.

A growing movement is arguing that we should redefine the relationship between society and economics. Across the world, students, the economists of the future, are rebelling against their education. From three members of this movement comes a book that tries to open up the black box of economic decision making to public scrutiny. We show how a particular form of economics has come to dominate in universities across the UK and has thus shaped our understanding of the economy. We document the weaknesses of this form of economics and how it has failed to address many important issues such as financial stability, environmental sustainability and inequality; and we set out a vision for how we can bring economic discussion and decision making back into the public sphere to ensure the societies of the future can flourish.

Paul Currion

mechanism for generating financial returns, both as an incentive for and an investment in innovation. 2 The end goal of humanitarian innovation should be positive impact on the lives and livelihoods of people affected by crisis, but while ‘[t]he presence of social returns to knowledge investments both through positive externalities and public goods generates an economic rationale for public support for such investments’ ( Frontier Economics, 2014 : 10), such an economic rationale does not exist for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Nadia Kiwan

6 The socio-economics of community Introduction This chapter focuses on three aspects of collective experience among young French-North Africans in Seine-Saint-Denis: the banlieue, the quartier (or cité) and racial discrimination. While the banlieue and the quartier are often considered as predominantly socio-economic categories, I argue that they can be seen as representing an interface between social and more cultural forms of identity. The interface between the socioeconomic and the cultural is also discussed in relation to the interviewees’ narratives of

in Identities, discourses and experiences
G.M. Peter Swann

3 There’s more to the economics of consumption than (almost) unconstrained utility maximisation G. M. Peter Swann This chapter was written in response to the presentation given at the CRIC workshop by Warde (Chapter 2 in this book). In summarising, Warde said that the main message of his paper was, perhaps, that there is more to the sociology of consumption than Thorstein Veblen. This is an important message, and relevant for two groups. First, to his fellow sociologists, that they should not be preoccupied with the exceptional and conspicuous forms of

in Innovation by demand
Hiob Finzel’s Rationarium praxeos medicae, 1565–89
Michael Stolberg

source and the way in which Finzel recorded the payments he received. In the following section, I will highlight the striking religious elements and connotations of his Rationarium and will place them into the context of his strong Protestant faith. My chapter will conclude with an analysis of the economics of Finzel's practice and of the relative importance of the payments he received from patients of different social and economic status. Hiob Finzel Hiob Finzel, or Iobus Fincelius as he latinised his name, was born around

in Accounting for health
Brendan Kennelly

10 The economics of mental health services Brendan Kennelly Introduction Mental health services include a broad range of services, from home and ­community-based facilities such as day hospitals and out-patient facilities, to acute care units and residential care services. This chapter presents a broad overview of key economic issues facing the provision of such services in Ireland. The key issues that are addressed include: (a) the nature and extent of mental illnesses in Ireland; (b) the resources spent on care provided to people with mental illnesses; and (c

in The economics of disability