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John MacKenzie and the study of imperialism
Cherry Leonardi

imperialism and the natural world, in which he argues that the scientific organisation of knowledge was ‘crucial to the pursuit of power’. 98 His 1988 The Empire of Nature is impressive in its range, from a deep chronology of European and African hunting to imperial hunting and conservation in India as well as Africa. It was welcomed by an Africanist reviewer for examining both African and European hunters

in Writing imperial histories
Tsetse, nagana and sleeping sickness in East and Central Africa
John M. MacKenzie

Tsetse Fly Problem , Oxford, 1971; John M. MacKenzie, The Empire of Nature, Hunting, Conservation and British Imperialism , Manchester, 1988. 10 F. I. C. Apted, ‘Sleeping Sickness in Tanganyika: past, present and future’, Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene , 56 (1962

in Imperialism and the natural world
Children’s popular literature and the demise of empire
Kathryn Castle

implicit in the colonial relationship give way to a more complex negotiation? The empire of nature One of the most characteristic images of the children’s papers before the Second World War was the hunter in the wild. He appeared on the covers of many papers and annuals in the act of repelling the advance of dangerous beasts or enraged tribesmen

in British culture and the end of empire
Abstract only
The environment, medicine, business and radicals
John M. MacKenzie
and
Nigel R. Dalziel

two sources, including Lyell, on desiccation theory. In the second he refers to the scientific achievements of the Smith expedition. 4 Ibid., p. 147. 5 John M. MacKenzie, Empires of Nature and the Nature of Empires: Imperialism, Scotland and the

in The Scots in South Africa
Anthony Webster

(Delhi, 182 THE FUTURE OF BRITAIN'S IMPERIAL HISTORY 1992); J. M. Mackenzie, The Empire of Nature: Hunting, Conservation and British Imperialism (Manchester, 1988); T. Griffiths and L. Robin, Ecology and Empire: Environmental History of Settler Societies (Edinburgh, 1997); M. Mann, British Rule on Indian Soil (New Delhi, 1999). 28 C. A. Bayly, Empire and Information (Cambridge, 1996). 183

in The Debate on the Rise of the British Empire
Abstract only
India in children’s periodicals
Kathryn Castle

–14, pp. 185–7; J. MacKenzie, The Empire of Nature , Manchester, 1988 , pp. 169–95. 7 ’Shall I go out to the Colonies? ‘, Young England , vol. XXI, September, 1899, pp. 40–3. 8 ’The question of ageing too soon

in Britannia’s children
Digesting Africa
Tim Youngs

. On Baldwin see John M. MacKenzie, The Empire of Nature: Hunting, Conservation and British Imperialism (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988 ), pp. 105–9. 55 On the connection between hunting and sexuality see for example MacKenzie, The Empire of Nature , pp. 42–3. MacKenzie’s book has some useful observations on

in Travellers in Africa
John M. MacKenzie
and
Nigel R. Dalziel

. 76 John M. MacKenzie, The Empire of Nature: Hunting, Conservation and British Imperialism (Manchester 1988), pp. 93–4. 77 This is still acknowledged by the museum’s website. 78 MacKenzie, Empire of Nature , notes

in The Scots in South Africa
A. Martin Wainwright

: Manchester University Press, 1987), 176–98; and John M. Mackenzie, The Empire of Nature: Hunting, Conservation and British Imperialism (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988 ), 26–51 and 168–99. 39 ‘The present practicable range of

in ‘The better class’ of Indians
British travel and tourism in the post-imperial world
Hsu-Ming Teo

Quoted in Brendon, Thomas Cook , p. 281. 11 Brendon, Thomas Cook , p. 311. 12 For the link between imperialism and game hunting and preservation, see John M. MacKenzie, The Empire of Nature: Hunting, Conservation and British Imperialism

in British culture and the end of empire