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Brian Sudlow

The aim of this book has been to cast light on the paradox of French Catholic literary resistance to secularisation in the period 1880–1914, and on its coincidental parallels among English Catholic writers of the same period. The task of remapping these writings against an analytical grid of secularisation theory was prompted by the weaknesses which we argued were inherent in approaching these writings simply under the confessional label of ‘Catholic’. This process has meant not discarding the category of Catholic literature, however

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
England’s altered confidence
Anne Sweeney

bereaved Catholics of what St Bernard called the ‘martyrdom of the heart’, harder to bear even than bodily martyrdom. 5 If this is also an account of the mood of English Catholics such as Byrd, as Southwell found them, they are an unhappy company indeed; the music of such men was indeed full of complaint and sadness: perfectly natural in the circumstances, Southwell suggests. The

in Robert Southwell
Brian Sudlow

This book has so far sought to explore the writings of the French and English Catholic literary revivals in the context of the secularisation of the individual and society. The aim has been to get beyond the limitations of confessional labels and to explore some of their inner dynamics in ways that cast more light on the confrontation between secularisation and resistance to it. One possible objection, however, to the critics of secularisation is that the indices of religiosity in society show that

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

The conditions of unbelief, according to Taylor, are affected by the pluralisation of worldviews and the multiplication of alternatives to erstwhile Christian certainties. 1 It is logical, therefore, that in responding to secularisation many French and English Catholic writers should subject such worldviews and alternatives to sometimes far-reaching scrutiny. As we saw in Chapter 1 the secularisation of mentalities in France and England was denoted by the shift towards a more anthropocentric conceptualisation

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

Cavanaugh’s essay on societal secularisation provides us with a useful paradigm from which to begin analysing anti-secular alternatives. 1 Exploring this paradigm in all its theological resonances is unnecessary. The political and socio-economic dynamics which it outlines correlate with, and in other ways challenge, French and English Catholic writings about societal organisation. On the political level, Cavanaugh argues that ‘Eucharistic counter-politics’ have the capacity to undermine the secular State in two

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

anthropocentric, melioristic and, with regard to religion, increasingly pluralist, indifferentist and sometimes even hostile. Reading French and English Catholic writers from this perspective yields much of interest. They make a variety of attempts to associate the Church with the secular political dispensations in which they were living – the problem was in fact how to resacralise the State – without at the same time undermining their religion by subjecting it to the legitimisation of the secular State. Crucially, most did not attempt to resacralise

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Abstract only
A Vatican rag
Alana Harris

intense media interest created by the gathering of the world’s Catholic bishops in Rome for the Second Vatican Council (1962–65) – is the key backdrop to this study of the transformations in English Catholic spirituality, social identity and popular religion from 1945 onwards. Also implicit in Lehrer’s lyrics are some of the chief preoccupations of the chapters which follow, which include the changing and vexed relationship between lay spirituality and autonomy, clerical identity and professional authority, as well as Roman centralisation and papal direction during the

in Faith in the family
Ulrike Ehret

03-ChurchNationRace_094-117 28/11/11 14:42 Page 94 3 New challenges and lasting legacies England Antisemitism and English Catholics, 1919–26 Antisemitic images after the First World War most likely occurred in English Catholic discussions of modern capitalism and socialism, but were not limited to the pure economic and political aspects. ‘Materialism’ was often associated with a ‘Jewish spirit’ that pervaded national film, theatre and literature in the immediate postwar years.1 Antisemitism was not limited to the pages of English Catholic newspapers at that

in Church, nation and race
Patrick Collinson

‘it seemeth’. The Articles were presented to the leading Appellant, Bagshaw, and are accompanied in the surviving manuscript by his answers.41 This is evidence of the extent to which Bancroft chose to work hand in glove with this small and very far from representative party of English Catholics. He entertained one of them, Thomas Bluet, an elderly priest with a drink problem, as his house guest at Fulham and assisted them with the publication of a whole string of anti-Jesuit books and pamphlets. He released four of 100 Bishop Richard Bancroft and the succession

in Doubtful and dangerous
St Thérèse of Lisieux, St Bernadette Soubirous and the Forty Martyrs
Alana Harris

presentation of saintly witness, seemed to be appreciated by the church hierarchy itself. On a visitation to Lisieux in 1980, Pope John Paul II emphatically stressed: Saints never grow old. They never become figures of the past, men and women of ‘yesterday’. On the contrary, they are always men and women of the future, witnesses of the world to come.8 For some English Catholics as the century progressed, ‘lighting a votive candle’ was no longer as efficacious in creating a connection with the communion of saints or conveying an image ‘of the world to come’. For others

in Faith in the family