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Stuart Kaufman

2504Chap3 7/4/03 3:53 pm Page 48 3 Ethnic conflict and Eurasian security Stuart Kaufman What role does ethnic conflict play in Eurasian security affairs? Just breaking this question down into its component parts uncovers a vast array of apparent influences. Ethnic conflict is, first of all, clearly a cause of internal conflict and insecurity, as demonstrated by the problems in Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Cyprus, Georgia, Chechnya and Mountainous Karabagh. Furthermore, it is a key cause of international security problems, as the above list of ethnic civil

in Limiting institutions?
Scenarios in south east Europe
Christian Giordano

4 Land reforms and ethnic tensions: scenarios in south east Europe Christian Giordano Introduction: ‘Staatsnation’ and the ‘purity myth’    and eastern Europe the specific combination of territory, language, creed with citizenship and/or nationality, is generally perceived as an invariable and inviolable heritage of individual and collective ‘identities’ (Conte 1995: 138). It is a widespread belief that can be found even in the most common aspects of everyday life. This belief reaches its political–institutional achievement in the concept of

in Potentials of disorder
Tanja Bueltmann and Donald M. MacRaild

4 Ethnic activities and leisure cultures It is proposed to hold the Anniversary dinner as usual on St George’s Day … to promote one of the primary objects of the original Founders, that of ‘cherishing social intercourse among themselves’. (Annual Report of the St George’s Society of New York (New York, 1870), p. 5) Let us then as Englishmen, and as Englishmen loving our country and countrymen, have a Society from which we can when in sickness or distress claim aid as our right and not as charity. (John S. King, Early History of the Sons of England Benevolent

in The English diaspora in North America
Abstract only
José Álvarez-Junco

1 Ethnic patriotism The birth of the nation Citizens of Madrid: With the imminent approach of the anniversary of the day that is the most glorious for our people and the most memorable in the annals of the Spanish nation, your constitutional town hall addresses you to announce that the day of the most noble and heroic remembrances, THE SECOND OF MAY, has arrived. On that day, in the name of independence, you made the throne of the most successful soldier of the century tremble beneath him, and, by offering your lives for the sake of your patria, you declared to

in Spanish identity in the age of nations
Catherine Baker

2 Histories of ethnicity, nation and migration Nationhood, ethnicity and migration have been linked in south-east Europe, including the Yugoslav region, since the descendants of Slav clans who migrated there from Central Asia in the sixth to eighth centuries CE and others living there who came to share their collective identity started to understand themselves as nations – however long ago or recently that might be (Fine 2006 ). Ottoman rule in south-east Europe, moreover, both represented and caused further migration. The region's nineteenth

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Cameron Ross

FAD4 10/17/2002 5:43 PM Page 53 4 From ethnic to legal and economic separatism Federalism and the ‘parade of sovereignties’ With a population of 145 million citizens the Russian Federation is one of the most populous and ethnically diverse states in the world. Within its vast territory, which encompasses one-eighth of the world’s land surface, reside 128 officially recognised nations and ethnic groups.1 As we discussed in chapter 2, of the 89 republics and regions that make up the Russian Federation, 32 are based on ethnic criteria; namely, 21 republics, 10

in Federalism and democratisation in Russia
Faïza Guène, Saphia Azzeddine, and Nadia Bouzid, or the birth of a new Maghrebi-French women’s literature
Patrick Saveau

2 Breaking the chains of ethnic identity: Faïza Guène, Saphia Azzeddine, and Nadia Bouzid, or the birth of a new Maghrebi-French women’s literature Patrick Saveau Some labels are hard to get rid of. They provide a helpful taxonomy to classify, sort out, or separate. They enable us to distinguish what can be included or excluded from the epistemological field we are exploring, and ultimately they give us a sense of order and clarity in a world that is becoming ever more complicated to understand, let alone to explain. This is particularly true in the humanities

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Margaret C. Flinn

This article traces what Élie Faure believed to be the racial, ethnic and geographic origins of art. Influenced by the writings of Gobineau and Taine, he asserts that the taxonomisation of species provides a model for the taxonomisation of artistic productions. The mixing of various races is evidenced in their artistic production, with the relative presence or absence of the rhythmic serving as an index for the presence or absence of certain types of blood, or racial/ethnic origins. Similarly, the qualities of the land where art is produced results in visible effects upon the (artistic) forms created by the people living in that geographic area. Métissage is considered a positive characteristic, and cinema the apogee of modern artistic production because of its integration of machine rhythms into the rhythms of human gesture.

Film Studies
A political history
Author: Sarah Glynn

This exploration of one of the most concentrated immigrant communities in Britain combines a new narrative history, a theoretical analysis of the evolving relationship between progressive left politics and ethnic minorities, and a critique of political multiculturalism. Its central concern is the perennial question of how to propagate an effective radical politics in a multicultural society: how to promote greater equality that benefits both ethnic minorities and the wider population, and why so little has been achieved. It charts how the Bengali Muslims in London’s East End have responded to the pulls of class, ethnicity and religion; and how these have been differently reinforced by wider political movements. Drawing on extensive recorded interviews, ethnographic observation, and long sorties into the local archives, it recounts and analyses the experiences of many of those who took part in over six decades of political history that range over secular nationalism, trade unionism, black radicalism, mainstream local politics, Islamism, and the rise and fall of the Respect Coalition. Through this Bengali case study and examples from wider immigrant politics, it traces the development and adoption of the concepts of popular frontism and revolutionary stages theory and of the identity politics that these ideas made possible. It demonstrates how these theories and tactics have cut across class-based organisation and acted as an impediment to tackling cross-cultural inequality; and it argues instead for a left alternative that addresses fundamental socio-economic divisions.

Joseph Hardwick

attracted the attention of historians of Roman Catholicism. The Canadian Catholic Church’s efforts to attach itself to organisations such as the St Patrick’s Society and the Hibernian Society in 1850s Toronto have been seen as an example of a Catholic attempt to fuse Roman Catholicism to an Irish ethnic consciousness. 4 Historians of Anglicanism have so far said little about the Church of

in An Anglican British World