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Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

secured remarkably extensive rights of self-government [ 11 ]. 2 The farm or annual payment of £300 into the king’s exchequer which was agreed by the citizens must have seemed attractive to the royal treasurer at the time of the charter, but the inflationary period of population growth and rising prices which followed will soon have rendered this an economically unrealistic return – a bargain for the townspeople

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

20 s. And paid to Richard Doughty for his expenses in going to London to labour to have allowance of the said £ 40 in the account of the said customer in the king’s exchequer this year 40 s. And paid for three pikes, two tenches and other fish given to the earl of Northumberland and his wife the countess when they dined in the town, on the orders of the mayor 24 s 7 d. And paid for one

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

in this royal writ which, because of the fastidiousness of the queen mother, removed the Jews from her towns to others. J. M. Rigg (ed.), Select Pleas, Starrs, and Other Records from the Rolls of the Exchequer of the Jews: A. ([a-z]+). 1220–1284 , Selden Society, XV, London: Quaritch, 1902, p. 85. Latin, transl. by the editor. By writ of the lord the king [Edward I

in Towns in medieval England
Gervase Rosser

. At Cambridge the brethren were at first received by the burgesses, who made over to them an old synagogue near the prison. But as the neighbourhood of the prison was intolerable to the brethren since both they and the gaolers had to use the same entrance, our lord the king gave them £ 6 13 s 4 d , which was sufficient for them to buy out the lease from the court of the exchequer. Then they

in Towns in medieval England
Anthony Musson
and
Edward Powell

multifarious, encompassing both executive and judicial functions and requiring close liaison with the exchequer, chancery and the various courts. By the later fourteenth and fifteenth centuries sheriffs were changed annually, though reappointment in subsequent years (after a suitable interval) was common. 15 [ 7.11 ] The sheriff often bore the brunt of complaints of injustice on the one hand and inefficiency or incompetence on the other

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Alison K. McHardy

king and council, and the king shall cause a remedy to be given upon his complaint, and those guilty to be punished. By the king. 125. Action against the king’s critics Sensitivity to criticism was a feature of government throughout the reign; see 21 , 135 . Issues of the Exchequer , ed. Frederick Devon (London, 1837 ), 239

in The reign of Richard II
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

, for rent paid to the king in his exchequer at Westminster for the farm of a pool in Stafford called the ‘kyngespoole’ for the same year, 26 s 8 d . Also for money paid to Sir John Stanley, former sheriff of Staffordshire, for green wax paid by you in the king’s exchequer, 70 s . 52 Also for money paid to him as former sheriff of Staffordshire for the king’s use for green wax, 46 s

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Alison K. McHardy

, John Holt, William Burgh, Roger Fulthorpe – and were sent to the Tower of London. The same day Sir John Cary, chief baron of the exchequer, was removed and despatched to the Tower for safe custody; and one John Lockton, serjeant-at-law, was also sent to the Tower along with them. On that day new judges were created, namely Walter Clopton, 2 chief justice of the king’s bench, and Robert Charlton, chief

in The reign of Richard II
Abstract only
Jennifer Ward

for women’s history, although it has to be borne in mind that the king was primarily interested in his rights and dues; the records therefore provide details of land, service, feudal incidents and payments made to the Crown. The Domesday Survey of 1086 and royal charters throw much light on women’s landholding, whether by way of inheritance, maritagium or dower. The Pipe Rolls of the exchequer of

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
Abstract only
Alison K. McHardy

and had to make do with exchequer annuities, which were not always promptly paid [133a] but, unlike Thomas, he seems to have borne no grudge against Richard for the failure to grant him a landed income appropriate to his status. He was loyal and conscientious during our period [154b] . His nature may have been easy-going, even lazy; his wife certainly found him dull. 9 Thomas of Woodstock, Edward

in The reign of Richard II